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    Nikki Haley Vows to Stay in the Race After Losing to Trump in South Carolina

    Despite another stinging defeat, this time on her home turf in South Carolina, Nikki Haley said on Saturday that she would forge ahead in the Republican primary race regardless of the daunting road ahead.Speaking to several hundred supporters at her watch party in a ballroom in Charleston, S.C., Ms. Haley, the former governor of the state, cast herself as the voice for the “huge numbers” of Americans looking for an alternative to President Biden and former President Donald J. Trump.She argued that Mr. Trump would be a losing candidate in November and that the nation could not afford four more years of his turbulence or what she described as Mr. Biden’s failures.“I know that 40 percent is not 50 percent,” she said to some laughs, nodding to her share of the vote around the time she spoke. “But I also know 40 percent is not some tiny group.”But she struck a more serious and determined tone in her remarks — so much so that as she began, it was difficult to tell whether she would indeed continue her bid, as she had pledged to do for weeks. But she soon put any speculation to rest.“I said earlier this week that no matter what happens in South Carolina, I will continue to run for office,” she said. “I am a woman of my word.”We are having trouble retrieving the article content.Please enable JavaScript in your browser settings.Thank you for your patience while we verify access. If you are in Reader mode please exit and log into your Times account, or subscribe for all of The Times.Thank you for your patience while we verify access.Already a subscriber? Log in.Want all of The Times? Subscribe. More

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    Haley’s Loss to Trump in South Carolina Fuels More Doubts About Her Viability

    Read five takeaways from Donald Trump’s big win over Nikki Haley in South Carolina.Former President Donald J. Trump easily defeated Nikki Haley in South Carolina’s Republican primary on Saturday, delivering a crushing blow in her home state and casting grave doubt on her long-term viability.Mr. Trump’s victory, called by The Associated Press, was widely expected, and offers fresh fodder for his contention that the race is effectively over. Ms. Haley pledged to continue her campaign, but the former president has swept the early states and is barreling toward the nomination even as a majority of delegates have yet to be awarded.“This was a little sooner than we anticipated,” he said in Columbia, S.C., minutes after the race was called, adding that he had “never seen the Republican Party so unified as it is right now.”Throughout his victory speech, Mr. Trump made it clear that he was eager to turn his attention to the general election, at one point telling the crowd: “I just wish we could do it quicker. Nine months is a long time.”He also did not mention Ms. Haley by name, alluding to her only twice: once to knock her for a disappointing finish in a Nevada primary contest with no practical value, and once for supporting an opponent of his in 2016.In her election-night speech in Charleston, S.C., Ms. Haley congratulated Mr. Trump on his victory. But she said the results — he was beating her by 60 percent to 39 percent as of late Saturday — demonstrated that “huge numbers of voters” were “saying they want an alternative.”We are having trouble retrieving the article content.Please enable JavaScript in your browser settings.Thank you for your patience while we verify access. If you are in Reader mode please exit and log into your Times account, or subscribe for all of The Times.Thank you for your patience while we verify access.Already a subscriber? Log in.Want all of The Times? Subscribe. More

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    Justice Thomas Hires Law Clerk Accused of Sending Racist Text Messages

    Crystal Clanton, who is close with the Thomas family, has said she does not remember sending the messages, which emerged in 2017.Justice Clarence Thomas recently hired a law clerk who was previously accused of sending racist text messages, resurfacing the controversy around her.Crystal Clanton will begin clerking for the justice in the upcoming term, according to the Antonin Scalia Law School, from which she graduated in 2022.In late 2017, a New Yorker story reported that Ms. Clanton, who had served for five years as the national field director at Turning Point USA, a conservative student group, had sent the text messages, including the statement “i hate black people,” to another employee. The New York Times has not seen the messages.Ms. Clanton, who had resigned from the group by the time the article came out, told The New Yorker at the time that she had no recollection of the messages and that “they do not reflect what I believe or who I am and the same was true when I was a teenager.” (Ms. Clanton would have been 20 years old when the messages were sent.) She did not respond to requests for comment on Saturday.In the years since, Ms. Clanton has maintained a close relationship with Justice Thomas and his wife, Virginia Thomas. Ms. Thomas once served on the advisory board of Turning Point USA, and subsequently hired Ms. Clanton. The justice has called the allegations against Ms. Clanton unfounded and said that he does not believe her to be racist.Justice Thomas did not respond to a request for comment.The Thomases have welcomed Ms. Clanton into their inner circle. Photos from the Thomases’ 2022 holiday newsletter show that she joined the couple for Thanksgiving dinner. The Thomases also celebrated her graduation from Scalia Law.We are having trouble retrieving the article content.Please enable JavaScript in your browser settings.Thank you for your patience while we verify access. If you are in Reader mode please exit and log into your Times account, or subscribe for all of The Times.Thank you for your patience while we verify access.Already a subscriber? Log in.Want all of The Times? Subscribe. More

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    5 Takeaways From Trump’s Big Win Over Nikki Haley in South Carolina

    Donald J. Trump lapped Nikki Haley in the Midwest. He beat her in the Northeast. He dominated in the West. And now he has trounced the former two-term governor in her home state of South Carolina.After nearly six weeks of primary contests in geographically, demographically and ideologically diverse states, even Ms. Haley’s most ardent supporters must squint to see the faintest path to the presidential nomination for her in 2024.The race was called the moment the polls closed, and within minutes an ebullient Mr. Trump took the stage, avoiding a mistake he made in New Hampshire when Ms. Haley spoke first and, even in defeat, gave a rousing speech that had irked him.“It’s an early evening,” Mr. Trump beamed.But Ms. Haley, the former United Nations ambassador, is still vowing to plow on, warning her party that sticking with Mr. Trump and the distractions of his four criminal indictments is a pathway to defeat in November.“Today is not the end of our story,” she declared.Here are five takeaways from the South Carolina primary and what comes next:Ms. Haley cast her ballot on Kiawah Island, S.C., with her mother and children.Ruth Fremson/The New York TimesIt was a home-state failure for Haley.She campaigned more aggressively. She spent more on television advertisements. She debuted a shiny new bus to traverse the state, and kept raking in donations.We are having trouble retrieving the article content.Please enable JavaScript in your browser settings.Thank you for your patience while we verify access. If you are in Reader mode please exit and log into your Times account, or subscribe for all of The Times.Thank you for your patience while we verify access.Already a subscriber? Log in.Want all of The Times? Subscribe. More

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    Suspect in UGA Killing Is Denied Bond as a Shaken Campus Mourns

    As more details emerged about the suspect in the death of a nursing student, the community remained in shock of the first homicide on the campus in decades.A 26-year-old man charged with kidnapping and murdering a nursing student at the University of Georgia in Athens will remain in jail after he was denied bond at a hearing on Saturday, the authorities said.The suspect, Jose Antonio Ibarra, lived in an apartment complex about one mile from a wooded trail where the body of Laken Riley, 22, was found on Thursday afternoon, said Jeffrey Clark, the chief of university police. Ms. Riley, a student at nearby Augusta University and a former student at the University of Georgia, had been reported missing by friends after she did not return from a run. Mr. Ibarra, a resident of Athens who is not a U.S. citizen, migrated to the United States from Venezuela, the authorities said. He was arrested by the Border Patrol for crossing the border illegally in September 2022 and was released quickly with temporary permission to stay in the country, a federal law enforcement official said Saturday. That release, or parole, was a practice the administration used when officials were overwhelmed with high numbers of crossings. The administration ended that practice about six months later. It was typical for many Venezuelans to be released with permission to stay temporarily because they could not be repatriated back to their country due to strained diplomatic relations. Some six million Venezuelans have fled their troubled country, the largest population displacement in Latin America’s modern history.On Saturday, it was not clear what Mr. Ibarra’s immigration status was. Many conservative politicians, including Gov. Brian Kemp of Georgia, on Saturday linked the killing to the immigration policies of President Biden, which they contend have overwhelmed the country with more migrants than the system can handle. Mike Johnson, the speaker of the House, urged the president to close the border. “House Republicans will continue to fight tooth and nail for a return to law and order,” Mr. Johnson said in a post on X.We are having trouble retrieving the article content.Please enable JavaScript in your browser settings.Thank you for your patience while we verify access. If you are in Reader mode please exit and log into your Times account, or subscribe for all of The Times.Thank you for your patience while we verify access.Already a subscriber? Log in.Want all of The Times? Subscribe. More

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    2024 SAG Awards Red Carpet: See the Best Fashion Looks

    Lily Gladstone, Cillian Murphy and Margot Robbie led the celebrity fashion brigade.A few short months ago, members of the Screen Actors Guild wore jeans, shorts and T-shirts while carrying picket signs in the last days of a lengthy strike. On Saturday, they were at their red-carpet best as they arrived at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles for the 30th annual Screen Actors Guild Awards.Before the ceremony, which is streaming on Netflix for the first time, Lily Gladstone, Jeremy Allen White, Margot Robbie, Cillian Murphy, Selena Gomez, Ali Wong, Ayo Edebiri and a host of other film and television stars took a moment to pose on the red carpet. The looks ran the gamut, from sober black and white to the wildly colorful. Scroll on to see the full celebrity fashion report.Lily Gladstone, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a leading role for “Killers of the Flower Moon.”Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressCillian Murphy, nominated for outstanding performance by an actor in a leading role for “Oppenheimer.”Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesMargot Robbie, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a leading role for “Barbie.”Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesColman Domingo, nominated for outstanding performance by an actor in a leading role for “Rustin.”Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesAnne Hathaway, a presenter.Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressIssa Rae, one of the hosts (with Kumail Nanjiani) of the SAG show.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesAli Wong, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a TV movie or limited series for “Beef.”Caroline Brehman/EPA, via ShutterstockJeremy Allen White, nominated for outstanding performance by an actor in a comedy series for “The Bear.”Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesCarey Mulligan, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a leading role for “Maestro.”Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesJeffrey Wright, nominated for outstanding performance by an actor in a leading role for “American Fiction.”Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesDa’Vine Joy Randolph, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a supporting role for “The Holdovers.”Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesBradley Cooper, nominated for outstanding performance by an actor in a leading role for “Maestro.”Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesSterling K. Brown, nominated for outstanding performance by an actor in a supporting role for “American Fiction.”Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressEmily Blunt, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a supporting role for “Oppenheimer.”Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressDanielle Brooks, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a supporting role for “The Color Purple.”Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesPenélope Cruz, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a supporting role for “Ferrari.”Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressSelena Gomez of “Only Murders in the Building,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesHalle Bailey of “The Color Purple,” a nominee for outstanding performance by a cast in a motion picture.Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesElaine Welteroth, a host of Netflix’s red-carpet preshow.Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressTan France, a host of the red-carpet preshow, and his outrageous bow tie.Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressAyo Edebiri, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a comedy series for “The Bear.”Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesAriana Greenblatt of “Barbie,” a nominee for outstanding performance by a cast in a motion picture.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesSheryl Lee Ralph of “Abbott Elementary,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesMeryl Streep of “Only Murders in the Building,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesAmerica Ferrera of “Barbie,” a nominee for outstanding performance by a cast in a motion picture.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesTracee Ellis Ross of “American Fiction,” a nominee for outstanding performance by a cast in a motion picture.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesReese Witherspoon of “The Morning Show,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a drama series.Mike Blake/ReutersGreta Lee of “The Morning Show,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a drama series.Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressLaverne Cox wore a vintage Alexander McQueen piece as part of her ensemble.Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressElizabeth Debicki, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a drama series for “The Crown,” in Giorgio Armani.Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressPedro Pascal, nominated for outstanding performance by an actor in a drama series for “The Last of Us.”Caroline Brehman/EPA, via ShutterstockTyler James Williams of “Abbott Elementary,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesChris Perfetti of “Abbott Elementary,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesErika Alexander of “American Fiction,” a nominee for outstanding performance by a cast in a motion picture.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesBrie Larson, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a TV movie or limited series for “Lessons in Chemistry.”Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesUzo Aduba, nominated for outstanding performance by an actress in a TV movie or limited series for “Painkiller.”Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesJessica Chastain, a presenter, in Giorgio Armani.Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesKelley Curran of “The Gilded Age,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a drama series.Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesBen Ahlers, a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a drama series, wore an outfit beyond the wildest sartorial dreams of the character he plays on “The Gilded Age.”Mike Blake/ReutersKaren Pittman of “The Morning Show,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a drama series.Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesDominic Sessa, a relative newcomer to the red carpet, dressed in black to represent “The Holdovers.”Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesMatty Matheson of “The Bear,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Mike Blake/ReutersHannah Leder of “The Morning Show,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a drama series.Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressEdwin Lee Gibson of “The Bear,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesAlan Ruck of “Succession,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a drama series.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesAuliʻi Cravalho of “Mean Girls.”Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesLinda Emond of “Only Murders in the Building,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Mike Blake/ReutersMichael Cyril Creighton of “Only Murders in the Building,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesCorey Hawkins of “The Color Purple,” a nominee for outstanding performance by a cast in a motion picture.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesWilliam Belleau of “Killers of the Flower Moon.”Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesCara Jade Myers of “Killers of the Flower Moon.”Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesNestor Carbonell of “The Morning Show,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a drama series.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesTaissa Farmiga of “The Gilded Age,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a drama series.Frazer Harrison/Getty ImagesZachary Golinger of “Barry,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Jordan Strauss/Invision, via Associated PressJuno Temple of “Ted Lasso,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Valerie Macon/Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesRobert Wisdom of “Barry,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Caroline Brehman/EPA, via ShutterstockThe writer and performance artist Alok Vaid-Menon.Caroline Brehman/EPA, via ShutterstockAndre Hyland of “Barry,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Caroline Brehman/EPA, via ShutterstockAnthony Carrigan of “Barry,” a nominee for outstanding performance by an ensemble in a comedy series.Frazer Harrison/Getty Images More

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    Arrest Made in Campbellsville University Student’s Killing

    An 18-year-old Campbellsville University student was found unresponsive in his dorm room early Saturday and later pronounced dead at a hospital, officials said.The police in Campbellsville, Ky., arrested a 21-year-old man who was wanted in connection with the killing of a Campbellsville University student on Saturday, officials said.The student, Josiah Malachi Kilman, 18, was found unresponsive in his dorm room around 12:43 a.m. and transferred to Taylor Regional Hospital, where he was pronounced dead, the police said in a statement.The police identified the man they arrested as Charles E. Escalera, 21. Officials said they had obtained a warrant for his arrest, charging him with murder.The university, which confirmed Mr. Escalera’s arrest on Saturday evening, said he was a student.The Campbellsville police said in a statement that Mr. Escalera was taken into custody after the Green County Sheriff’s Office and Kentucky State Police “received a call of a suspicious male inside a barn.” The State Police responded to the call and arrested Mr. Escalera.Details of what led up to Mr. Kilman’s death were unavailable.John D. Bertram, the county attorney for Taylor County, said in an interview on Saturday night that he believed Mr. Escalera and Mr. Kilman knew each other, but “I’m not aware of any history between them.”Video surveillance helped lead the authorities to identifying Mr. Escalera as a person of interest, he said.Calling the case “way beyond unusual,” Mr. Bertram said he was not aware of “anything of this nature occurring on the campus, and it’s a relatively small campus.”Joseph Hopkins, the president of Campbellsville University, said in a statement that the university was “grieving the loss of one of our family.”“We have lost a student and our hearts are broken,” he said. “During this devastating time, the continued safety of our students and the residents of our community are our primary concern. With consultation from local law enforcement, we will continue to implement every measure necessary to protect and support students and our community.”Campbellsville University is a Christian university with a main campus of more than 100 acres, 85 miles southeast of Louisville, Ky. It has an enrollment of about 12,000 students.Mr. Kilman’s death was the third case of fatal violence involving college students since Feb. 16.A University of Colorado student was arrested on Monday on murder charges related to the fatal shooting of two people, one of them his roommate. And on Friday, the authorities in Georgia arrested a 26-year-old man in the killing of an Augusta University student whose body was found in a wooded area at the University of Georgia in Athens.Rebecca Carballo More

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    Haley’s Traditional Campaign Was No Match Against Trump in South Carolina

    Some campaign professionals wonder if playing it safe was ever going to shake up the race.Nikki Haley has proudly called herself the underdog in the Republican presidential nomination fight, telling South Carolina audiences over and over how she defeated, or at least outlasted, 12 other candidates, all of them men, and then adding, “I just have one more fella to catch.”But in her race in South Carolina to catch that fellow, former President Donald J. Trump, she ran an exceptionally conventional campaign, crisscrossing the state in a bus, delivering her stump speech almost word for word, over and over, and seldom taking questions from the audience or the news media in attendance. Her guest speakers were local mayors and prosecutors.As the campaign for her home state came to a close, ending in a swift victory for Mr. Trump on Saturday night, some campaign professionals question how such a cautious effort was ever going to shake up a nominating contest in which Mr. Trump had already won the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary, and held a clear lead in South Carolina.Lis Smith, who helped run the presidential campaign of Pete Buttigieg in 2020, putting a little-known former mayor of South Bend, Ind., on the political map, said that once Ms. Haley got the race down to a two-candidate contest, “there was a huge opportunity to make a splash.”But in the state where she served as governor, Ms. Haley didn’t do much of what a candidate trying to close a yawning gap would do, Ms. Smith said — such as take questions from voters or pull stunts to grab press attention, like showing up at campaign events with surprise guests.“If you are the underdog, if you are trying to drive the narrative, you have to understand what drives the media,” she said, “and you have to be willing to make news, not give set speeches.”We are having trouble retrieving the article content.Please enable JavaScript in your browser settings.Thank you for your patience while we verify access. If you are in Reader mode please exit and log into your Times account, or subscribe for all of The Times.Thank you for your patience while we verify access.Already a subscriber? Log in.Want all of The Times? Subscribe. More