More stories

  • in

    Merkel’s Party to Choose New Leader, and Possible Successor as Chancellor

    AdvertisementContinue reading the main storySupported byContinue reading the main storyMerkel’s Party to Choose New Leader, and Possible Successor as ChancellorAfter nearly a year of jockeying, no clear front-runner has emerged to lead Germany’s Christian Democratic Union. Three men are vying for delegates’ votes this weekend.Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany, shown last month, has led her country for the past 15 years. She stepped down as party leader in 2018.Credit…Michael Kappeler/DPA, via Associated PressJan. 15, 2021, 9:28 a.m. ETBERLIN — Germany’s largest political party will choose a new leader on Saturday, with the winner well positioned to succeed Angela Merkel as the next chancellor of Europe’s leading economy.Regardless of the result, it will signal a new chapter for Germany and Europe, where the staid but steady leadership of Ms. Merkel has been a constant for the past 15 years. She earned respect for holding Europe together through repeated crises and, most recently, her deft handling of the coronavirus pandemic over the past year.“In a sense, an era is ending,” said Herfried Münkler, a political scientist at Humboldt University in Berlin. “But in certain basic positions, such as the geopolitical situation and the economic conditions within the E.U., that all remains unchanged, regardless of who’s the chancellor.”German voters will elect a new government on Sept. 26, and Ms. Merkel’s conservative Christian Democratic Union remains the country’s most popular party, according to a survey by Infratest/Dimap last week.Ms. Merkel led the party for 18 years, stepping down in 2018. She was replaced by one-time heir apparent Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, who announced her own departure nearly a year ago over internal party strife. Since then, three men have been jockeying for the leadership position. But no clear front-runner has emerged.While all three candidates appear to have a lot in common — all male, all Roman Catholic, all from the western German state of North Rhine-Westphalia — each harbors a divergent vision of the future of the party that has governed Germany for 50 of the past 70 years.Here is a look at the candidates and where their leadership could take Germany:Leadership skills have been the strongest campaign point for the governor of Germany’s North Rhine-Westphalia state, Armin Laschet.Credit…Pool photo by Marius BeckerArmin Laschet — the CentristIn terms of experience, Mr. Laschet, the governor of Germany’s most populous state, North Rhine-Westphalia since 2017, has the strongest hand. The only candidate who has won an election and served as a governor, the 59-year-old Mr. Laschet has nevertheless struggled to generate enthusiasm for his campaign.He announced his candidacy last February, flanked by Ms. Merkel’s health minister, Jens Spahn, who ranked above the chancellor as Germany’s most popular politician in a survey in late December. Mr. Spahn had sought the party leadership position in 2018, but this time around, he pledged to back Mr. Laschet.The popularity of Mr. Spahn and another man who is not vying for party leadership, Markus Söder, the governor of Bavaria, has led top Christian Democratic officials to sever the decision over who will run for chancellor in elections from the party leader vote on Saturday. That means that whoever is chosen party leader will not necessarily be the next chancellor.Mr. Spahn’s backing of Mr. Laschet was supposed to garner support from those who saw in the 40-year-old Mr. Spahn a chance to rejuvenate the party. But instead, it has shifted the focus to a possible scenario in which the health minister could run for chancellor while Mr. Laschet remains party leader.Mr. Laschet is seen as the candidate most likely to continue Ms. Merkel’s centrist style of stable politics. He is a strong supporter of German industry and shares the chancellor’s idea that Germany benefits from diversity and integration.Staunchly pro-European, Mr. Laschet also considers a strong relationship with Russia as central to Germany’s success, although he views the United States and NATO as essential to lasting security in Europe.Friedrich Merz has not held political office since 2002, when Ms. Merkel ousted him as leader of the Christian Democrats’ party caucus in Parliament.Credit…Pool photo by Michael KappelerFriedrich Merz — the ConservativeMr. Merz, a former lawmaker, is viewed as the candidate most likely to break with Ms. Merkel’s style of leadership and return the party to its more traditional conservative identity. At the same time, he has had to reassure voters that the would not move “one millimeter” toward the far-right Alternative for Germany.Mr. Merz, 65, has not held political office since 2002, when Ms. Merkel pushed him out as leader of the Christian Democrats’ party caucus in Parliament. Three years later, he left politics for the private sector, where he amassed a personal fortune that he has played down in the campaign, portraying himself as upper-middle class instead of a millionaire.He is the least popular with women, who flocked to the party under Ms. Merkel’s leadership and became an important voting bloc. Many recall that Mr. Merz voted against criminalizing rape within marriage in 1997, and Anja Karliczek, Germany’s minister for education, has warned that his penchant for a sharp quip on hot-button issues such as immigration could threaten party cohesion.But that style is popular with young conservatives and the party’s right flank, which welcomes his criticism of Ms. Merkel’s decision to take in nearly 1 million migrants in 2015 and his calls to return to tighter fiscal policy.A proponent of strong ties between Europe and the United States, Mr. Merz views a deeply integrated European Union more skeptically and criticized the recent 1.8 trillion euro, or $2.2 trillion, stimulus and budget package agreed to in Brussels, which included issuing joint debt — long a no-go for Germany. Norbert Röttgen, a former environment minister, has focused on issues that appeal to younger voters, including climate change and digitization.Credit…Pool photo by Christoph SoederNorbert Röttgen — the Dark HorseMr. Röttgen, a former environment minister under Ms. Merkel, has been seen as less of a favorite, although he recently had a strong showing in polls. It is probably not enough, however, to ensure him a clear shot at the party leadership. Still, the 55-year-old foreign policy expert could carve out a path to the top if the race comes down to a runoff between him and Mr. Merz.Mr. Röttgen lost his post as environment minister in 2012 after a poor performance in the race for governor of North Rhine-Westphalia that year. Since then, he has become a leading foreign policy expert in Parliament and took many by surprise when he entered the race for the party leadership.Mr. Röttgen has built a following among younger voters and women, pointing to his role in working to transform the German economy to one powered by green energy and emphasizing the importance of improving digital infrastructure and know-how to position the country for a future where it can compete with China or the United States.Mr. Röttgen says he wants to build on the issues of diversity and equality championed by Ms. Merkel, ensuring the conservative Christian Democrats remain relevant in the face of a rise in popularity of the Greens, especially among young urban voters. He is in favor of continued European integration and strong ties to Washington, but he says that Germany needs to take a stronger role in the trans-Atlantic relationship.He many have enhanced his appeal to party delegates who have an eye on the general election in the fall with his willingness to cede the candidacy for chancellor if it is in the party’s best interests, stressing the importance of teamwork over individualism.Christopher F. Schuetze More

  • in

    El abismo estadounidense

    #masthead-section-label, #masthead-bar-one { display: none }Capitol Riot FalloutInside the SiegeVisual TimelineNotable ArrestsCapitol Police in CrisisThe police forced the crowd out of the Capitol building after facing off in the Rotunda, Jan. 6, 3:40 p.m.Credit…Ashley Gilbertson/VII, for The New York TimesEl abismo estadounidenseTrump, la turba y lo que viene después: observaciones de un historiador del fascismo y la atrocidad política.The police forced the crowd out of the Capitol building after facing off in the Rotunda, Jan. 6, 3:40 p.m.Credit…Ashley Gilbertson/VII, for The New York TimesSupported byContinue reading the main story15 de enero de 2021Actualizado 08:30 ETRead in EnglishLire en françaisCuando Donald Trump se paró frente a sus seguidores el 6 de enero y los instó a marchar hacia el Capitolio de Estados Unidos, estaba haciendo lo que siempre había hecho. Nunca tomó en serio la democracia electoral ni aceptó la legitimidad de su versión estadounidense.Incluso cuando ganó, en 2016, insistió en que la elección fue fraudulenta, que se emitieron millones de votos falsos para su oponente. En 2020, sabiendo que iba detrás de Joe Biden en las encuestas, pasó meses afirmando que la elección presidencial estaba amañada y señalando que no aceptaría los resultados si no le favorecían. El día de las elecciones afirmó erróneamente que había ganado y luego endureció su retórica: con el tiempo, su victoria se convirtió en una avalancha histórica y las diversas conspiraciones que la negaban cada vez eran más sofisticadas e inverosímiles.La gente le creyó, lo que no es para nada sorprendente. Se necesita una gran cantidad de trabajo para educar a los ciudadanos a resistir la poderosa atracción de creer lo que ya creen, o lo que otros a su alrededor creen, o lo que le daría sentido a sus propias decisiones anteriores. Platón advirtió de un riesgo particular sobre los tiranos: que al final se verían rodeados de gente que siempre les dice que sí y de facilitadores. A Aristóteles le preocupaba que, en una democracia, un demagogo rico y talentoso pudiera dominar fácilmente las mentes de la población. Conscientes de estos y otros riesgos, los creadores de la Constitución de Estados Unidos instituyeron un sistema de pesos y contrapesos. No se trataba simplemente de asegurar que ninguna rama del gobierno dominase a las demás, sino también de anclar en las instituciones diferentes puntos de vista.Listen to This ArticleAudio Recording by AudmEn este sentido, la responsabilidad de la presión de Trump para anular una elección debe ser compartida por un gran número de miembros republicanos del Congreso. En vez de contradecir a Trump desde el principio, permitieron que su ficción electoral floreciera. Tenían motivos para hacerlo. Un grupo de integrantes del Partido Republicano se preocupa sobre todo por jugar con el sistema para mantener el poder, aprovechando al máximo las imprecisiones constitucionales, las manipulaciones y el dinero sucio para ganar las elecciones con una minoría de votantes motivados. No les interesa que colapse la peculiar forma de representación que permite a su partido minoritario un control desproporcionado del gobierno. El más importante de ellos, Mitch McConnell, permitió la mentira de Trump sin hacer ningún comentario sobre sus consecuencias.Sin embargo, otros republicanos vieron la situación de manera diferente: podrían realmente romper el sistema y tener el poder sin democracia. La división entre estos dos grupos, los que participan en el juego y los que quieren patear el tablero, se hizo muy evidente el 30 de diciembre, cuando el senador Josh Hawley anunció que apoyaría la impugnación de Trump al cuestionar la validez de los votos electorales el 6 de enero. En ese momento, Ted Cruz prometió su propio apoyo, junto con otros diez senadores. Más de un centenar de representantes republicanos asumieron la misma postura. Para muchos, esto lucía como un espectáculo más: las impugnaciones a los votos electorales de los estados forzarían retrasos y votos en el pleno pero no afectarían al resultado.Los extremistas pro-Trump intentan escalar las paredes del edificio del Capitolio en Washington para pasar las barreras y entrar, 2:09 p. m.Credit…Ashley Gilbertson/VII para The New York TimesSin embargo, que el Congreso obviara sus funciones básicas tenía un precio. Una institución elegida que se opone a las elecciones está invitando a su propio derrocamiento. Los miembros del Congreso que sostuvieron la mentira del presidente, a pesar de la evidencia disponible y sin ambigüedades, traicionaron su misión constitucional. Hacer de sus ficciones la base de la acción del Congreso les dio vigor. Ahora Trump podría exigir que los senadores y congresistas se sometan a su voluntad. Podía poner la responsabilidad personal sobre Mike Pence, a cargo de los procedimientos formales, para pervertirlos. Y el 6 de enero, ordenó a sus seguidores que ejercieran presión sobre estos representantes elegidos, lo que procedieron a hacer: asaltaron el edificio del Capitolio, buscaron gente para castigar y saquearon el lugar.Por supuesto que esto tenía sentido de cierto modo: si la elección realmente había sido robada, como los senadores y congresistas insinuaban, entonces ¿cómo se podía permitir que el Congreso siguiera adelante? Para algunos republicanos, la invasión del Capitolio debe haber sido una sorpresa, o incluso una lección. Sin embargo, para quienes buscaban una ruptura, puede haber sido un atisbo del futuro. Luego, ocho senadores y más de 100 representantes votaron a favor de la mentira que les obligó a huir de sus cámaras.Los insurrectos amenazaron y persiguieron al agente Eugene Goodman dentro del Capitolio, a las 2:13 p. m.Credit…Ashley Gilbertson/VII para The New York TimesLa posverdad es prefascismo, y Trump ha sido nuestro presidente de la posverdad. Cuando renunciamos a la verdad, concedemos el poder a aquellos con la riqueza y el carisma para crear un espectáculo en su lugar. Sin un acuerdo sobre algunos hechos básicos, los ciudadanos no pueden formar una sociedad civil que les permita defenderse. Si perdemos las instituciones que producen hechos que nos conciernen, entonces tendemos a revolcarnos en atractivas abstracciones y ficciones. La verdad se defiende particularmente mal cuando no queda mucho de ella, y la era de Trump —como la era de Vladimir Putin en Rusia— es una de decadencia de las noticias locales. Las redes sociales no son un sustituto: sobrecargan los hábitos mentales por los que buscamos estímulo emocional y comodidad, lo que significa perder la distinción entre lo que se siente verdadero y lo que realmente es verdadero.La posverdad desgasta el Estado de derecho e invita a un régimen de mitos. Estos últimos cuatro años, los estudiosos han discutido la legitimidad y el valor de invocar el fascismo en referencia a la propaganda trumpista. Una posición cómoda ha sido etiquetar cualquier esfuerzo como una comparación directa y luego tratar esas comparaciones como tabú. De manera más productiva, el filósofo Jason Stanley ha tratado el fascismo como un fenómeno, como una serie de patrones que pueden observarse no solo en la Europa de entreguerras sino más allá de esa época.Mi propia opinión es que un mayor conocimiento del pasado, fascista o no, nos permite notar y conceptualizar elementos del presente que de otra manera podríamos ignorar, y pensar más ampliamente sobre las posibilidades futuras. En octubre me quedó claro que el comportamiento de Trump presagiaba un golpe de Estado, y lo dije por escrito; esto no es porque el presente repita el pasado, sino porque el pasado ilumina el presente.Una turba furiosa se enfrentó a la policía mientras intentaba entrar en el Capitolio, a las 2:00 p. m.Credit…Ashley Gilbertson/VII para The New York TimesComo los líderes fascistas históricos, Trump se ha presentado como la única fuente de la verdad. Su uso del término fake news (“noticias falsas”) se hizo eco de la difamación nazi Lügenpresse (“prensa mentirosa”); como los nazis, se refirió a los reporteros como “enemigos del pueblo”. Como Adolf Hitler, llegó al poder en un momento en que la prensa convencional había recibido una paliza; la crisis financiera de 2008 hizo a los periódicos estadounidenses lo que la Gran Depresión le hizo a los diarios alemanes. Los nazis pensaron que podían usar la radio para remplazar el viejo pluralismo del periódico; Trump trató de hacer lo mismo con Twitter.Gracias a la capacidad tecnológica y al talento personal, Donald Trump mintió a un ritmo tal vez inigualado por ningún otro líder de la historia. En su mayor parte eran pequeñas mentiras, y su principal efecto era acumulativo. Creer en todas ellas era aceptar la autoridad de un solo hombre, porque creer en ellas era descreer en todo lo demás. Una vez establecida esa autoridad personal, el mandatario podía tratar a todos los demás como mentirosos; incluso tenía el poder de convertir a alguien de un consejero de confianza en un deshonesto sinvergüenza con un solo tuit. Sin embargo, mientras no pudiera imponer una mentira verdaderamente grande, una fantasía que crease una realidad alternativa en la que la gente pudiera vivir y morir, su prefascismo se quedó corto.Un busto de George Washington, con una gorra de Trump, mientras los intrusos recorrían el edificio, a las 2:34 p. m.Credit…Ashley Gilbertson para The New York TimesAlgunas de sus mentiras fueron, sin duda, de tamaño mediano: que era un hombre de negocios exitoso; que Rusia no lo apoyó en 2016; que Barack Obama nació en Kenia. Esas mentiras de tamaño medio eran la norma de los aspirantes a autoritaristas en el siglo XXI. En Polonia el partido de la derecha construyó un culto al martirio que giraba en torno a responsabilizar a los rivales políticos por el accidente de avión que mató al presidente de la nación. El húngaro Viktor Orban culpa a un número cada vez más reducido de refugiados musulmanes de los problemas de su país. Pero esas afirmaciones no eran grandes mentiras; se extendían pero no rompían lo que Hannah Arendt llamaba “el tejido de la realidad”.Una gran mentira histórica discutida por Arendt es la explicación de Joseph Stalin de la hambruna en la Ucrania soviética en 1932-33. El Estado había colectivizado la agricultura, y luego aplicó una serie de medidas punitivas contra Ucrania que provocaron la muerte de millones de personas. Sin embargo, la versión oficial era que los hambrientos eran provocadores, agentes de las potencias occidentales que odiaban tanto el socialismo que se estaban matando a sí mismos. Una ficción aún más grande, en el relato de Arendt, es el antisemitismo hitleriano: las afirmaciones de que los judíos dirigían el mundo, los judíos eran responsables de las ideas que envenenaban las mentes alemanas, los judíos apuñalaron a Alemania por la espalda durante la Primera Guerra Mundial. Curiosamente, Arendt pensaba que las grandes mentiras solo funcionan en las mentes solitarias; su coherencia sustituye a la experiencia y al compañerismo.En noviembre de 2020, al llegar a millones de mentes solitarias a través de las redes sociales, Trump dijo una mentira peligrosamente ambiciosa: que había ganado unas elecciones que, de hecho, había perdido. Esta mentira era grande en todos los aspectos pertinentes: no tan grande como “los judíos dirigen el mundo”, pero lo suficientemente grande. La importancia del asunto en cuestión era grande: el derecho a gobernar el país más poderoso del mundo y la eficacia y fiabilidad de sus procedimientos de sucesión. El nivel de mendacidad era profundo. La afirmación no solo era errónea, sino que también se hizo de mala fe, en medio de fuentes poco fiables. Cuestionaba no solo las pruebas sino también la lógica: ¿Cómo podría (y por qué debería) una elección haber sido amañada contra un presidente republicano pero no contra senadores y representantes republicanos? Trump tuvo que hablar, absurdamente, de una “Elección (para Presidente) amañada”.Afuera del Capitolio, la multitud aplaudía mientras los asaltantes entraban en el edificio a las 2:10 p. m.Credit…Ashley Gilbertson/VII para The New York TimesLa fuerza de una gran mentira reside en su demanda de que muchas otras cosas deben ser creídas o no creídas. Para dar sentido a un mundo en el que las elecciones presidenciales de 2020 fueron robadas se requiere desconfiar no solo de los reporteros y de los expertos, sino también de las instituciones gubernamentales locales, estatales y federales, desde los trabajadores electorales hasta los funcionarios electos, la Seguridad Nacional y hasta la Corte Suprema. Esto trae consigo, por necesidad, una teoría de la conspiración: imagina a toda la gente que debe haber estado en ese complot y a toda la gente que habría tenido que trabajar en el encubrimiento.La ficción electoral de Trump flota libre de la realidad verificable. Está defendida no tanto por hechos como por afirmaciones de que alguien más ha hecho algunas afirmaciones. La sensibilidad es que algo debe estar mal porque siento que está mal, y sé que otros sienten lo mismo. Cuando líderes políticos como Ted Cruz o Jim Jordan hablaban así, lo que querían decir era: crees mis mentiras, lo que me obliga a repetirlas. Las redes sociales proporcionan una infinidad de pruebas aparentes para cualquier condena, especialmente una aparentemente sostenida por un presidente.En la superficie, una teoría de la conspiración hace que su víctima parezca fuerte: ve a Trump como resistiendo a los demócratas, los republicanos, el Estado Profundo, los pedófilos, los satanistas. Sin embargo, más profundamente, invierte la posición de los fuertes y los débiles. El enfoque de Trump en las supuestas “irregularidades” y “estados disputados” se reduce a las ciudades donde los negros viven y votan. En el fondo, la fantasía del fraude es la de un crimen cometido por los negros contra los blancos.No es solo que el fraude electoral de los afroestadounidenses contra Donald Trump nunca haya ocurrido. Es que es todo lo contrario de lo que sucedió, en 2020 y en todas las elecciones estadounidenses. Como siempre, los negros esperaron más tiempo que los demás para votar y era más probable que sus votos fuesen impugnados. Era más probable que estuvieran sufriendo o muriendo a causa de la COVID-19, y menos probable que pudieran tomarse un tiempo fuera del trabajo. La protección histórica de su derecho al voto fue eliminada por el fallo de 2013 de la Corte Suprema en el caso del Condado de Shelby contra Holder, y los estados se han apresurado a aprobar medidas del tipo que históricamente reducen el voto de los pobres y las comunidades de color.La afirmación de que a Trump se le negó una victoria por fraude es una gran mentira, no solo porque atenta contra la lógica, describe mal el presente y exige creer en una conspiración. Es una gran mentira, fundamentalmente, porque invierte el campo moral de la política estadounidense y la estructura básica de la historia estadounidense.Cuando el senador Ted Cruz anunció su intención de impugnar el voto del Colegio Electoral, invocó el Compromiso de 1877, que resolvió la elección presidencial de 1876. Los comentaristas señalaron que esto no era un precedente relevante, ya que en ese entonces realmente habían graves irregularidades de los votantes y se produjo un impasse en el Congreso. Para los afroestadounidenses, sin embargo, la referencia aparentemente gratuita llevaba a otra parte. El Compromiso de 1877 —por el que Rutherford B. Hayes tendría la presidencia, siempre que retirara el poder federal del Sur— fue el mismo acuerdo por el que los afroestadounidenses fueron expulsados de las casillas de votación durante la mayor parte del siglo. Fue el fin de la Reconstrucción, el comienzo de la segregación, la discriminación legal y Jim Crow. Es el pecado original de la historia afroestadounidenses en la era posesclavitud, nuestro más cercano roce con el fascismo hasta ahora.Si la referencia parecía distante cuando Ted Cruz y 10 colegas senadores dieron a conocer su declaración el 2 de enero, se acercó mucho cuatro días después, cuando las banderas confederadas desfilaron por el Capitolio.Un camarógrafo de The Daily Caller, un sitio web de derecha, después de ser rociado con gas pimienta durante el caos en el Capitolio, a las 3:45 p. m.Credit…Ashley Gilbertson/VII para The New York TimesAlgunas cosas han cambiado desde 1877, por supuesto. En ese entonces, eran los republicanos, o muchos de ellos, los que apoyaban la igualdad racial; eran los demócratas, el partido del sur, los que querían el apartheid. Fueron los demócratas, en ese entonces, quienes llamaron fraudulentos los votos de los afroestadounidenses, y los republicanos quienes querían que fueran contados. Esto se ha invertido ahora. En el último medio siglo, desde la Ley de Derechos Civiles, los republicanos se han convertido en un partido predominantemente blanco interesado —como Trump declaró abiertamente— en mantener el número de votantes, y en particular el número de votantes negros, lo más bajo posible. Sin embargo, el hilo conductor sigue siendo el mismo. Al ver a los supremacistas blancos entre la gente que asaltaba el Capitolio, era fácil ceder a la sensación de que algo puro había sido violado. Sería mejor ver el episodio como parte de una larga discusión estadounidense sobre quién merece ser representado.Los demócratas se han convertido en una coalición, una que lo hace mejor que los republicanos entre los votantes femeninos y no blancos y consigue votos tanto de los sindicatos como de los universitarios. Sin embargo, no es del todo correcto contrastar esta coalición con un Partido Republicano monolítico. En este momento, el Partido Republicano es una coalición de dos tipos de personas: aquellos que jugarían con el sistema (la mayoría de los políticos, algunos de los votantes) y aquellos que sueñan con romperlo (algunos de los políticos, muchos de los votantes). En enero de 2021, esto fue visible como la diferencia entre los republicanos que defendían el sistema actual con el argumento de que les favorecía y los que trataban de derribarlo.En las cuatro décadas desde la elección de Ronald Reagan, los republicanos han superado la tensión entre los jugadores y los rupturistas gobernando en oposición al gobierno, o llamando a las elecciones una revolución (el Tea Party), o afirmando que se oponen a las élites. Los rupturistas, en este arreglo, proporcionan una cobertura a los jugadores, al presentar una ideología que distrae de la realidad básica de que el gobierno bajo los republicanos no se hace más pequeño sino que simplemente se desvía para servir a una serie de intereses..css-1xzcza9{list-style-type:disc;padding-inline-start:1em;}.css-c7gg1r{font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-weight:700;font-size:0.875rem;line-height:0.875rem;margin-bottom:15px;color:#121212 !important;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-c7gg1r{font-size:0.9375rem;line-height:0.9375rem;}}.css-rqynmc{font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-size:0.9375rem;line-height:1.25rem;color:#333;margin-bottom:0.78125rem;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-rqynmc{font-size:1.0625rem;line-height:1.5rem;margin-bottom:0.9375rem;}}.css-rqynmc strong{font-weight:600;}.css-rqynmc em{font-style:italic;}.css-yoay6m{margin:0 auto 5px;font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-weight:700;font-size:1.125rem;line-height:1.3125rem;color:#121212;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-yoay6m{font-size:1.25rem;line-height:1.4375rem;}}.css-1dg6kl4{margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;}.css-16ed7iq{width:100%;display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;-webkit-align-items:center;-webkit-box-align:center;-ms-flex-align:center;align-items:center;-webkit-box-pack:center;-webkit-justify-content:center;-ms-flex-pack:center;justify-content:center;padding:10px 0;background-color:white;}.css-pmm6ed{display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;-webkit-align-items:center;-webkit-box-align:center;-ms-flex-align:center;align-items:center;}.css-pmm6ed > :not(:first-child){margin-left:5px;}.css-5gimkt{font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-size:0.8125rem;font-weight:700;-webkit-letter-spacing:0.03em;-moz-letter-spacing:0.03em;-ms-letter-spacing:0.03em;letter-spacing:0.03em;text-transform:uppercase;color:#333;}.css-5gimkt:after{content:’Collapse’;}.css-rdoyk0{-webkit-transition:all 0.5s ease;transition:all 0.5s ease;-webkit-transform:rotate(180deg);-ms-transform:rotate(180deg);transform:rotate(180deg);}.css-eb027h{max-height:5000px;-webkit-transition:max-height 0.5s ease;transition:max-height 0.5s ease;}.css-6mllg9{-webkit-transition:all 0.5s ease;transition:all 0.5s ease;position:relative;opacity:0;}.css-6mllg9:before{content:”;background-image:linear-gradient(180deg,transparent,#ffffff);background-image:-webkit-linear-gradient(270deg,rgba(255,255,255,0),#ffffff);height:80px;width:100%;position:absolute;bottom:0px;pointer-events:none;}#masthead-bar-one{display:none;}#masthead-bar-one{display:none;}.css-1cs27wo{background-color:white;border:1px solid #e2e2e2;width:calc(100% – 40px);max-width:600px;margin:1.5rem auto 1.9rem;padding:15px;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-1cs27wo{padding:20px;}}.css-1cs27wo:focus{outline:1px solid #e2e2e2;}.css-1cs27wo[data-truncated] .css-rdoyk0{-webkit-transform:rotate(0deg);-ms-transform:rotate(0deg);transform:rotate(0deg);}.css-1cs27wo[data-truncated] .css-eb027h{max-height:300px;overflow:hidden;-webkit-transition:none;transition:none;}.css-1cs27wo[data-truncated] .css-5gimkt:after{content:’See more’;}.css-1cs27wo[data-truncated] .css-6mllg9{opacity:1;}.css-k9atqk{margin:0 auto;overflow:hidden;}.css-k9atqk strong{font-weight:700;}.css-k9atqk em{font-style:italic;}.css-k9atqk a{color:#326891;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;border-bottom:1px solid #ccd9e3;}.css-k9atqk a:visited{color:#333;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;border-bottom:1px solid #ddd;}.css-k9atqk a:hover{border-bottom:none;}Capitol Riot FalloutFrom Riot to ImpeachmentThe riot inside the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, followed a rally at which President Trump made an inflammatory speech to his supporters, questioning the results of the election. Here’s a look at what happened and the ongoing fallout:As this video shows, poor planning and a restive crowd encouraged by President Trump set the stage for the riot.A two hour period was crucial to turning the rally into the riot.Several Trump administration officials, including cabinet members Betsy DeVos and Elaine Chao, announced that they were stepping down as a result of the riot.Federal prosecutors have charged more than 70 people, including some who appeared in viral photos and videos of the riot. Officials expect to eventually charge hundreds of others.The House voted to impeach the president on charges of “inciting an insurrection” that led to the rampage by his supporters.Al principio, Trump parecía una amenaza para ese equilibrio. Su falta de experiencia en política y su racismo abierto lo hicieron una figura muy incómoda para el partido; al principio, republicanos prominentes consideraban que su hábito de mentir continuamente era grosero. Sin embargo, después de ganar la presidencia, sus particulares habilidades como rupturista parecían crear una tremenda oportunidad para los jugadores. Liderados por el jugador en jefe, McConnell, consiguieron cientos de jueces federales y recortes de impuestos para los ricos.Trump no se parecía a otros rupturistas porque parecía no tener ninguna ideología. Su objeción a las instituciones radicaba en que podían limitarlo personalmente. Tenía la intención de romper el sistema para servirse a sí mismo y, en parte, ha fracasado por eso. Trump es un político carismático e inspira devoción no solo entre los votantes sino también entre un sorprendente número de legisladores, pero no tiene una visión más grande que la suya o la que sus admiradores proyectan sobre él. En este sentido, su prefascismo no estuvo a la altura del fascismo: su visión nunca fue más allá de un espejo. Llegó a una mentira verdaderamente grande no desde cualquier visión del mundo sino desde la realidad de que podría perder algo.Sin embargo, Trump nunca preparó un golpe decisivo. Carecía del apoyo de los militares, algunos de cuyos líderes había alienado. (Ningún verdadero fascista habría cometido el error que cometió allí, que fue amar abiertamente a dictadores extranjeros; a los partidarios convencidos de que el enemigo estaba en casa podría no importarles, pero a los que juraron proteger de los enemigos en el extranjero sí les importó). La fuerza de policía secreta de Trump, los hombres que realizaban operaciones de secuestro en Portland, era violenta pero también pequeña y ridícula. Las redes sociales demostraron ser un arma contundente: Trump podía anunciar sus intenciones en Twitter, y los supremacistas blancos podían planear su invasión del Capitolio en Facebook o en Gab. Pero el presidente, a pesar de todas sus demandas, ruegos y amenazas a los funcionarios públicos, no podía maquinar una situación que terminase con las personas correctas haciendo lo incorrecto. Trump pudo hacer creer a algunos votantes que había ganado las elecciones de 2020, pero no pudo hacer que las instituciones se alinearan con su gran mentira. Y pudo traer a sus partidarios a Washington y enviarlos al Capitolio, pero ninguno parecía tener una idea muy clara de cómo funcionaría esto o de lo que su presencia lograría. Es difícil pensar en un momento insurreccional comparable —con la toma de un edificio de gran importancia— que implicó tanto trabajo.Una mujer que había sido rociada con gas pimienta se apoyó en la puerta este de la rotonda del Capitolio, a las 3:47 p. m.Credit…Ashley Gilbertson/VII para The New York TimesLa mentira dura más que el mentiroso. La idea de que Alemania perdió la Primera Guerra Mundial en 1918 por una “puñalada por la espalda” judía tenía 15 años cuando Hitler llegó al poder. ¿Cómo funcionará el mito de la victimización de Trump en la vida estadounidense dentro de 15 años? ¿Y en beneficio de quién?El 7 de enero, Trump pidió una transición pacífica del poder, admitiendo implícitamente que su golpe de Estado había fracasado. Sin embargo, volvió a repetir e incluso amplió su ficción electoral: ahora era una causa sagrada por la que la gente se había sacrificado. La puñalada por la espalda imaginaria de Trump vivirá principalmente gracias a su respaldo por los miembros del Congreso. En noviembre y diciembre de 2020, los republicanos lo repitieron, dándole una vida que de otra manera no hubiera tenido. En retrospectiva, ahora parece como si el último compromiso tambaleante entre los jugadores y los rupturistas fuera la idea de que Trump debería tener todas las oportunidades de probar que se le había hecho mal. Esa posición apoyaba implícitamente la gran mentira de los partidarios de Trump que se inclinaban a creerla. No pudo contener a Trump, cuya gran mentira solo se hizo más grande.En ese momento, los rupturistas y los jugadores vieron un mundo diferente por delante, donde la gran mentira era un tesoro que había que tener o un peligro que había que evitar. Los rupturistas no tuvieron más remedio que apresurarse a ser los primeros en afirmar que creían en ella. Debido a que los rupturistas Josh Hawley y Ted Cruz deben competir para reclamar el azufre y la bilis, los jugadores se vieron obligados a revelar su propia mano, y la división dentro de la coalición republicana se hizo visible el 6 de enero. La invasión del Capitolio solo reforzó esta división. Por supuesto, algunos senadores retiraron sus objeciones, pero Cruz y Hawley siguieron adelante de todos modos, junto con otros seis senadores. Más de 100 representantes doblaron su apuesta en la gran mentira. Algunos, como Matt Gaetz, incluso añadieron sus propias florituras, como la afirmación de que la turba no estaba liderada por los partidarios de Trump sino por sus oponentes.Trump es, por ahora, el mártir en jefe, el sumo sacerdote de la gran mentira. Él es el líder de los rupturistas, al menos en la mente de sus partidarios. Por ahora, los jugadores no quieren a Trump cerca. Desacreditado en sus últimas semanas, es inútil; despojado de las obligaciones de la presidencia, volverá a ser embarazoso, como lo fue en 2015. Incapaz de proporcionar una cobertura para jugar astutamente, será irrelevante para sus propósitos diarios. Pero los rupturistas tienen una razón aún más fuerte para buscar la desaparición de Trump: es imposible heredar de alguien que todavía está por aquí. Aprovechar la gran mentira de Trump podría parecer un gesto de apoyo. De hecho, expresa un deseo de su muerte política. Transformar el mito de uno sobre Trump a uno sobre la nación será más fácil cuando esté fuera del camino.Como Cruz y Hawley pueden aprender, decir la gran mentira es ser propiedad de ella. Solo porque hayas vendido tu alma no significa que hayas hecho un buen negocio. Hawley no tiene ningún nivel de hipocresía; hijo de un banquero, educado en la Universidad de Stanford y en la Escuela de Derecho de Yale, denuncia a las élites. En la medida en que se pensaba que Cruz se apegaba a un principio, el de los derechos de los estados, que los llamados a la acción de Trump violaban descaradamente. Una declaración conjunta que Cruz emitió sobre la impugnación de los senadores al voto captó muy bien el aspecto posverdadero del conjunto: nunca alegó que hubiera fraude, solo que había alegaciones de fraude. Alegaciones de alegaciones, alegaciones hasta el final.Una mezcla de gas lacrimógeno lanzado por la policía y residuos de extintores de incendios descargados por extremistas pro-Trump flotaba en el aire de la Rotonda mientras la multitud merodeaba alrededor, a las 2:38 p. m.Credit…Ashley Gilbertson/VII para The New York TimesLa gran mentira requiere compromiso. Cuando los jugadores republicanos no se arriesgan lo suficiente, los rupturistas republicanos los llaman “RINO”, que en inglés es la sigla de “republicanos solo de nombre”. Este término alguna vez sugirió una falta de compromiso ideológico. Ahora significa una falta de voluntad para echar abajo una elección. Los jugadores, en respuesta, cierran filas en torno a la Constitución y hablan de principios y tradiciones. Todos los rupturistas deben saber (con la posible excepción del senador por Alabama Tommy Tuberville) que están participando en una farsa, pero tendrán una audiencia de decenas de millones que no lo saben.Si Trump sigue presente en la vida política estadounidense, seguramente repetirá su gran mentira incesantemente. Hawley, Cruz y los otros rupturistas comparten la responsabilidad de lo que eso desencadenará. Cruz y Hawley parecen estar postulándose para la presidencia. ¿Pero qué significa ser candidato a la presidencia y denunciar el voto? Si afirmas que el otro lado ha hecho trampa, y tus partidarios te creen, esperarán que te engañes a ti mismo. Al defender la gran mentira de Trump el 6 de enero, ellos sentaron un precedente: un candidato presidencial republicano que pierde una elección debe ser nombrado de todos modos por el Congreso. Los republicanos en el futuro, por lo menos los candidatos a presidente de la ruptura, presumiblemente tendrán un Plan A, para ganar y ganar, y un Plan B, para perder y ganar. No es necesario el fraude; solo las alegaciones de que hay alegaciones de fraude. La verdad debe ser remplazada por el espectáculo, los hechos por la fe.El intento de golpe de Trump de 2020-21, como otros intentos fallidos de golpe, es una advertencia para quienes se preocupan por el Estado de derecho y una lección para aquellos que no lo hacen. Su prefascismo reveló una posibilidad para la política estadounidense. Para que un golpe de Estado funcione en 2024, los rupturistas necesitarán algo que Trump nunca tuvo: una minoría furiosa, organizada para la violencia nacional, dispuesta a añadir intimidación a las elecciones. Cuatro años de amplificación de una gran mentira podría darles eso. Afirmar que el otro lado robó una elección es prometer que tú también robarás una. También es afirmar que el otro bando merece ser castigado.Observadores informados dentro y fuera del gobierno están de acuerdo en que la supremacía blanca de la derecha es la mayor amenaza terrorista para Estados Unidos. La venta de armas en 2020 alcanzó un nivel asombroso. La historia muestra que la violencia política ocurre luego de que los líderes prominentes de los principales partidos políticos abrazan abiertamente la paranoia.Nuestra gran mentira es típicamente estadounidense, envuelta en nuestro extraño sistema electoral, y depende de nuestras particulares tradiciones de racismo. Sin embargo, nuestra gran mentira también es estructuralmente fascista, con su extrema mendacidad, su pensamiento conspirativo, su inversión de los perpetradores y las víctimas y su implicación de que el mundo está dividido entre nosotros y ellos. Para mantenerlo en marcha durante cuatro años hay que cortejar el terrorismo y el asesinato.Cuando esa violencia llegue, los rupturistas tendrán que reaccionar. Si la aceptan, se convierten en la facción fascista. El Partido Republicano estará dividido, al menos por un tiempo. Uno puede, por supuesto, imaginar una funesta reunificación: un candidato de la ruptura pierde una estrecha elección presidencial en noviembre de 2024 y grita fraude, los republicanos ganan ambas cámaras del Congreso y los alborotadores en la calle, educados por cuatro años de la gran mentira, exigen lo que ven como justicia. ¿Se mantendrían los jugadores con los principios si esas fueran las circunstancias del 6 de enero de 2025?Sin embargo, este momento también es una oportunidad. Es posible que un Partido Republicano dividido sirva mejor a la democracia estadounidense; que los jugadores, separados de los rupturistas, empiecen a pensar en la política como una forma de ganar elecciones. Es muy probable que el gobierno de Biden-Harris tenga unos primeros meses más fáciles de lo esperado; tal vez se suspenda el obstruccionismo, al menos entre unos pocos republicanos y por poco tiempo, para vivir un momento de cuestionamientos. Los políticos que quieren que el trumpismo termine tienen un camino sencillo: decir la verdad sobre las elecciones.Estados Unidos no sobrevivirá a la gran mentira solo porque un mentiroso esté separado del poder. Necesitará una reflexiva repluralización de los medios y un compromiso con los hechos como un bien público. El racismo estructurado en cada aspecto del intento de golpe es un llamado a prestar atención a nuestra propia historia. La atención seria al pasado nos ayuda a ver los riesgos pero también sugiere la posibilidad de futuro. No podemos ser una república democrática si decimos mentiras sobre la raza, grandes o pequeñas. La democracia no consiste en minimizar el voto ni en ignorarlo, ni en jugar ni en romper un sistema, sino en aceptar la igualdad de los demás, escuchar sus voces y contar sus votos.Timothy Snyder es el profesor de la cátedra Levin de historia en la Universidad de Yale y el autor de historias de atrocidades políticas como Tierras de sangre y Tierra negra, así como del libro Sobre la tiranía, sobre el giro de Estados Unidos hacia el autoritarismo. Su libro más reciente es Nuestra enfermedad, unas memorias de su propia enfermedad casi mortal que refleja la relación entre la salud y la libertad. Ashley Gilbertson es una fotoperiodista australiana de la VII Photo Agency que vive en Nueva York. Gilbertson ha cubierto la migración y los conflictos a nivel internacional durante más de veinte años.AdvertisementContinue reading the main story More

  • in

    Lankford Apologizes to Black Constituents for Election Objections

    #masthead-section-label, #masthead-bar-one { display: none }Capitol Riot FalloutInside the SiegeVisual TimelineNotable ArrestsCapitol Police in CrisisAdvertisementContinue reading the main storyLive Updates: Pelosi Expected to Speak About ImpeachmentA Republican senator from Oklahoma apologizes to Black constituents for seeking to disenfranchise them.Jan. 15, 2021, 7:59 a.m. ETJan. 15, 2021, 7:59 a.m. ETMike Ives and Senator James Lankford, Republican of Oklahoma, in October. He has apologized for trying to reverse the results of the presidential election and disenfranchise tens of millions of voters.Credit…Anna Moneymaker for The New York TimesSenator James Lankford, an Oklahoma Republican who spent weeks trying to reverse the results of the presidential election before changing his mind at the last moment, apologized on Thursday to Black constituents who felt he had attacked their right to vote.In a letter addressed to his “friends” in North Tulsa, which has many Black residents, Mr. Lankford, who is white, wrote on Thursday that his efforts to challenge the election result had “caused a firestorm of suspicion among many of my friends, particularly in Black communities around the state.”“After decades of fighting for voting rights, many Black friends in Oklahoma saw this as a direct attack on their right to vote, for their vote to matter, and even a belief that their votes made an election in our country illegitimate,” he wrote, according to the news site Tulsa World.Mr. Lankford said in the letter that he had never intended to “diminish the voice of any Black American.” Still, he added, “I should have recognized how what I said and what I did could be interpreted by many of you.”Mr. Lankford, who sits on a key Senate oversight committee, was initially one of the Republicans who tried to upend Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s victory, even as courts threw out baseless questions raised by President Trump and his allies about election malfeasance.Democrats in Congress have viewed Mr. Lankford as a rare, cooperative partner on voting rights, and his decision to join those Republicans seeking to disenfranchise tens of millions of voters — many of them Black citizens living in Philadelphia, Detroit, Milwaukee and Atlanta — came as a surprise.The first indication he might do so came during his appearance in December at a Senate hearing about alleged voting “irregularities,” when he repeated unsupported Trump campaign allegations about voting in Nevada that had been debunked in court nearly two weeks earlier.Mr. Lankford and other Republicans had claimed that by challenging the election results, they were exercising their independence and acting in the interests of constituents who were demanding answers.“There are lots of folks in my state that still want those answers to come out,” Mr. Lankford said a few days before the Electoral College vote was certified.After the riot at the Capitol, Mr. Lankford was one of several Republican senators who abandoned their earlier challenge, saying the lawlessness and chaos had caused them to changed their minds.In a joint statement that night with Senator Steve Daines, Republican of Montana, Mr. Lankford called on “the entire Congress to come together and vote to certify the election results.”Mr. Lankford has faced calls from Black leaders to resign from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Commission, which is designed to commemorate the racist massacre in the city’s Greenwood district, an affluent Black community known as Black Wall Street. The massacre, which took place 100 years ago this spring, was one of the worst instances of racist violence in American history. A white mob destroyed the neighborhood and its Black-owned businesses, and up to 300 residents were killed.AdvertisementContinue reading the main story More

  • in

    North Korea Unveils New Submarine-Launched Ballistic Missile

    AdvertisementContinue reading the main storySupported byContinue reading the main storyNorth Korea Unveils New Submarine-Launched Ballistic MissileDays before President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s inauguration, the North made its latest demonstration of its nuclear might at a Pyongyang military parade. North Korean state media released this photo of missiles at a military parade in Pyongyang, the capital, on Thursday night.Credit…Korean Central News Agency, via Associated PressJan. 15, 2021, 7:01 a.m. ETSEOUL, South Korea — A month before the U.S. presidential election, North Korea’s leader, Kim Jong-un, held a military parade that featured what appeared to be the country’s largest-ever intercontinental ballistic missile. This week, just days before President-elect Joseph R. Biden Jr.’s inauguration, the North Korean dictator held another parade, showing off a new submarine-launched ballistic missile.To the Kim regime, the nighttime military parades in Pyongyang, the capital, were demonstrations of power meant to boost domestic morale amid crippling economic sanctions. To the Biden administration, they foreshadow what could become the incoming president’s greatest foreign policy challenge.The timing of the two flashy exhibitions has drawn attention to the diplomatic freeze between the two countries. In North Korea, Mr. Biden is inheriting a rival whose nuclear ambition is bolder and more dangerous than it was four years ago, when President Barack Obama left office.The parades underscored that North Korea has been silently ramping up its nuclear capability for years, even as President Trump claimed that his top-down, personality-driven diplomacy with Mr. Kim meant the North was “no longer a nuclear threat.”“If anything, the North’s nuclear threat has only grown,” said Yun Duk-min, a former chancellor of the Korea National Diplomatic Academy in Seoul. “The military parade is evidence.”This week’s parade came at the end of the eight-day congress held by North Korea’s ruling Workers’ Party, which was closely monitored by outside analysts for clues to how Mr. Kim might recalibrate his policy toward Washington.Kim Jong-un, center, the North’s leader, recently promised to “further strengthen our nuclear deterrence.”Credit…Korean Central News Agency, via Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesMr. Kim used the congress to celebrate the North’s nuclear arsenal as one of ​his proudest achievements, and to apologize to his people for the deepening economic woes caused by the pandemic and the devastating international sanctions imposed since the country’s fourth nuclear test in 2016.Mr. Kim’s historic summits with Mr. Trump in Singapore and Vietnam failed to end those sanctions. With his back against the wall and diplomacy with the United States at a standstill, some experts warn that Mr. Kim may return to testing missiles to bring Washington back to the negotiating table with more attractive proposals.North Korea has a history of retreating deeper into isolation and raising tensions to strengthen its leverage when negotiations do not lead to concessions, or when a new American president takes office.“North Korea leaves little doubt about its intentions: It wanted to be treated as an equal in nuclear arms reduction talks with the United States,” said Cheon Seong-whun, a former director of the Korea Institute for National Unification, a think tank in Seoul. “The new weapons disclosed during two parades have never been tested before and we don’t know whether they are actually working,” Mr. Cheon said. “But we know in what direction North Korea is headed.” The earlier parade, held on Oct. 10 to mark a party anniversary, unveiled what appeared to be the largest intercontinental ballistic missile the North had ever built. It also featured a Pukguksong-4, a new version of a submarine-launched ballistic missile, or SLBM. Neither weapon has been tested.The SLBM displayed during the parade on Thursday look​ed like yet another upgraded, untested version of the one North Korea has been developing under Mr. Kim, along with its Hwasong land-based intercontinental ballistic missiles.Another state media image from the parade on Thursday.Credit…Korean Central News Agency, via Associated PressNorth Korea tested three Hwasong ICBMs in 2017. After the last such test, it claimed that it could now target the continental United States with a nuclear warhead.Images of this week’s parade released through state media showed Mr. Kim proudly observing the neat columns of missiles, rockets, tanks and goose-stepping soldiers marching across the main plaza in Pyongyang, named after his grandfather, the North’s founder, Kim Il-sung.The parade also featured fireworks and military planes firing flares in the night sky as crowds of people danced at the plaza, state media reported on Friday.Kim Jong-un has vowed to strengthen the North’s nuclear deterrent ​since his talks with Mr. Trump stalled​ in 2019​. And as the economy continues to deteriorate, his bargaining opportunities are limited.“The armed forces of the Republic will strictly contain any military threats in the region of the Korean Peninsula and preemptively use the strongest offensive power to thoroughly smash the hostile forces if they jeopardize the security of our state even a bit,” Defense Minister Kim Jong-gwan of North Korea was quoted as saying during the parade. (He was referring to the North, whose formal name is the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.)At the party congress, Mr. Kim made it clear that the steep economic challenges facing the North would not affect his weapons program. He called his nuclear arsenal the greatest achievement “in the history of the Korean nation” and vowed to “further strengthen our nuclear deterrence.”Dancing in Pyongyang on Thursday.Credit…Korean Central News Agency, via Agence France-Presse — Getty ImagesHe also offered an unusually detailed wish list of weapons, from “hypersonic gliding-flight warheads” and military reconnaissance satellites to “ultramodern tactical nuclear weapons,” which have become a growing concern for the United States and allies in the region, including South Korea and Japan.North Korea has seen its nuclear force as the best tool for ensuring the continuity of the Kim family’s dynastic rule, and as a bargaining chip to extract economic and other concessions from the United States. During the party congress, Mr. Kim claimed that his nuclear weapons had made North Korea safer from American threats, putting it in a better position to rebuild its economy.His hardening stance reflects “deep rage and disappointment” after his failed negotiations with Mr. Trump, said Lee Byong-chul, a North Korea expert at the Institute for Far Eastern Studies at Kyungnam University in South Korea.The government of South Korea’s president, Moon Jae-in, helped to arrange the Trump-Kim summits, which were centered on cultivating personal trust between the two leaders with the hope of reaching a breakthrough. Mr. Trump wanted a nuclear-free peninsula, and Mr. Kim wanted an end to the sanctions. Their meetings went nowhere, though North Korea has since refrained from major provocations as it waited out the confusion of the American presidential election.The election is now over, but chaos has only deepened in the United States, and Mr. Kim’s patience may be running thin. “We can expect him to raise tensions depending on whether and how Biden responds,” said Mr. Lee.AdvertisementContinue reading the main story More

  • in

    El ‘sálvese quien pueda’ electoral no sacará a Ecuador de la crisis

    AdvertisementContinue reading the main storyOpiniónSupported byContinue reading the main storyPeriscopio electoralEl ‘sálvese quien pueda’ electoral no sacará a Ecuador de la crisisLa campaña electoral en Ecuador ha revelado el estado actual del país: se vive un espíritu de resignación y apatía.Una mujer ve una pancarta de la campaña de Guillermo Lasso en Quito, la capital de Ecuador, el 11 de enero de 2021Credit…Jose Jacome/EPA vía ShutterstockEs escritor ecuatoriano.15 de enero de 2021QUITO — Ecuador está ya adentrado en el ciclo electoral. El 7 de febrero serán las elecciones generales —en las que se elegirá al nuevo presidente y a los miembros de la Asamblea Nacional— y el camino para llegar a ellas ha sido revelador. Nos ha mostrado el estado actual del país: con las elecciones a la puerta, y en medio de un panorama económico y de salud desolador, en Ecuador se vive un espíritu de resignación.El año pasado se filtró un video donde uno de los candidatos a la presidencia, el conservador Guillermo Lasso, hablaba sobre sus rivales y se presentaba como la única alternativa libre de las taras de los partidos tradicionales. Al referirse al posible voto por Álvaro Noboa, un empresario millonario que ha sido seis veces candidato a la presidencia, Lasso soltó una mala palabra: “Tampoco podemos decir […]: ‘Vota por Álvaro, ya, qué chuchas’”. Ese “ya, qué chuchas” significa “ya nada importa”. Sin alternativas políticas con plataformas claras en medio de una sobreoferta de opciones en la boleta, la frase accidentalmente condensa el espíritu de la democracia en Ecuador rumbo a las elecciones: apatía, escepticismo y desgaste.Pero los ecuatorianos no debemos permitir que líderes con propuestas disparatadas (o sin plataformas realistas) guíen nuestro destino. Debemos hacer a un lado el voto de “ya nada importa” y adoptar una actitud proactiva y ciudadana frente a los grandes desafíos de nuestro futuro inmediato.Para finales de diciembre se habían inscrito 16 binomios —el mayor número desde el retorno del Ecuador a la democracia— de los cuales solo tres tienen posibilidades numéricas de llegar a la presidencia o, al menos, a una segunda vuelta: la fórmula del conservador Guillermo Lasso, la del correísta Andrés Arauz y la de Yaku Pérez Guartambel, por Pachakutik —el brazo político del movimiento indígena ecuatoriano—. Las otras candidaturas no superan el 2 por ciento de la intención del voto y, sin embargo, no lucen dispuestas a formar frentes unidos o alianzas estratégicas ni a deponer sus campañas. Le hacen la vista gorda a la opinión popular: algunas encuestas indican que hasta un 37 por ciento de los electores planea anular su voto o votar en blanco.Aunque finalmente Noboa —quien se había convertido desde hace años en un chiste nacional — no logró ser candidato, llegó a disputarse los primeros lugares en intención de voto después de su anuncio. Sus propuestas ingenuas y su extravagancia para muchos lucían menos desalentadoras que las otras candidaturas. Lo suficiente, al menos, para convencerlo de intentar lanzarse.Pese a que hay 16 candidaturas, en Ecuador no existen 16 visiones de país. Tampoco hay una contienda de ideas y proyectos, sino la “ley del sálvese quien pueda” entre la clase política y la indiferencia de una parte de la población (aunque el 90 por ciento de los encuestados en un sondeo opina que el rumbo del país está equivocado). El voto “ya, qué chuchas” es una advertencia de lo que sucede cuando la democracia y sus instituciones pierden credibilidad. Una cultura democrática débil cede terreno, voz y legitimidad a las propuestas más estridentes y demagógicas. Es un peligro real ante el que estamos ahora los ecuatorianos.La falta de alternativas se puede traducir en una democracia frágil en medio de un escenario poco favorable: con el desafío sanitario de la pandemia y la economía profundamente golpeada en 2020. Según el Banco Mundial, la ecuatoriana fue la tercera economía que más decreció de Sudamérica el año pasado.La frase que le endilgó Lasso al voto por Noboa se convirtió en un espejo para Ecuador. Por un lado, refleja una disputa entre las fuerzas políticas dominantes de los últimos diez años y, por otro, el caos. Y, entre los ciudadanos, un cierto aire de apatía reflejado en el voto nulo y el escepticismo.¿Cómo votarán, entonces, los ecuatorianos? La opción de la alternativa menos mala ha sido una constante en los últimos años, con políticos que se aprovechan de cuán baja está la barra de expectativas: incluso hay un candidato rechazado por su propio partido. Por una parte nuestros políticos tienen que profesionalizarse, y, por otra, los ciudadanos tendríamos que reclamar mejores opciones políticas. Para ambos casos, debemos librarnos del “ya qué chuchas”.En estos meses de campaña, hemos visto que las tres candidaturas más viables caen en la demagogia. Los correístas se han centrado en la promesa mesiánica —y sin sustento económico alguno— de regalar mil dólares a un millón de personas. Lasso, miembro del Opus Dei, en los últimos meses ofreció legalizar el porte de armas en el sector rural. Y el tercer candidato, Yaku Pérez, ha prometido un gobierno ambientalista que, al mismo tiempo, recuperaría el subsidio a los combustibles.Hay mucho en juego como para aceptar estas propuestas desarticuladas: Ecuador deberá navegar los siguientes años en la realidad pospandémica con una región en crisis y con desafíos de vacunación enormes. También tendrá que sentar las bases para resolver nuestros grandes problemas históricos, de la consolidación de nuestra democracia (recordemos que hace solo unos años dominó en el país un gobierno con espíritu caudillista) y la erradicación de la corrupción (no con promesas al aire, sino con cambios estructurales, transparencia y ejercicios independientes de rendición de cuentas).Los partidos son, en teoría, herramientas de participación ciudadana pero se convierten en obstáculos cuando están así de desconectados con la realidad nacional. De modo que hay un reto doble para la nación: por un parte, los partidos políticos deben replantear sus agendas y plataformas y conectarse de nuevo con la complicada realidad del país (y de la región). Y, por otra parte, los ciudadanos debemos eliminar el queimportismo y la apatía para reclamar una clase política profesional que haga a un lado la improvisación y opte por el compromiso democrático.Cuando el futuro de un país y su estabilidad democrática (después de años de atropellos institucionales) está en la línea, a todos debe importarnos quién llega al Palacio del Carondelet.Iván Ulchur-Rota es escritor y comediante en Ecuador.AdvertisementContinue reading the main story More

  • in

    Why Are There So Few Courageous Senators?

    AdvertisementContinue reading the main storyOpinionSupported byContinue reading the main storyWhy Are There So Few Courageous Senators?Here’s what we need to do if we want more Mitt Romneys and fewer Josh Hawleys.Mr. Beinart is a contributing opinion writer who focuses on American politics and foreign policy.Jan. 15, 2021, 5:04 a.m. ETTwo of the few Republican senators willing to defy President Trump: Mitt Romney, left, and John McCain.Credit…Brooks Kraft/Corbis, via Getty ImagesNow that Donald Trump has been defanged, leading Republicans are rushing to denounce him. It’s a little late. The circumstances were different then, but a year ago, only one Republican senator, Mitt Romney, backed impeachment. In a party that has been largely servile, Mr. Romney’s courage stands out.Why, in the face of immense pressure, did Mr. Romney defend the rule of law? And what would it take to produce more senators like him? These questions are crucial if America’s constitutional system, which has been exposed as shockingly fragile, is to survive. The answer may be surprising: To get more courageous senators, Americans should elect more who are near the end of their political careers.This doesn’t just mean old politicians — today’s average senator is, after all, over 60. It means senators with the stature to stand alone.As a septuagenarian who entered the Senate after serving as his party’s presidential nominee, Mr. Romney contrasts sharply with up-and-comers like Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz, who seem to view the institution as little more than a steppingstone to the White House. But historically, senators like Mr. Romney who have reached a stage of life where popularity matters less and legacy matters more have often proved better able to defy public pressure.In 1956, Senator John F. Kennedy — despite himself skipping a vote two years earlier on censuring the demagogue Joseph McCarthy — chronicled senators who represented “profiles in courage.” Among his examples were two legendary Southerners, Thomas Hart Benton and Sam Houston, who a century earlier had become pariahs for opposing the drive toward secession.Benton, who had joined the Senate when Missouri became a state, had by 1851 been serving in that role for an unprecedented 30 years. Benton’s commitment to the Union led him to be repudiated by his state party, stripped of most of his committee assignments, defeated for re-election and almost assassinated. In his last statement to his constituents, he wrote, “I despise the bubble popularity that is won without merit and lost without crime.”Houston enjoyed similar renown in his home state, Texas. He had served as commander in chief of the army that won independence from Mexico, and as the first president of the Republic of Texas. In 1854, he became the only Southern Democratic senator to oppose the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which he feared might break the country apart over the expansion of slavery. He did so “in spite of all the intimidations, or threats, or discountenances that may be thrown upon me,” which included being denounced by his state’s legislature, and later almost shot. Houston called it “the most unpopular vote I ever gave” but also “the wisest and most patriotic.”It’s easy to see the parallels with Mr. Romney. Asked in 2019 why he was behaving differently from other Republican senators, he responded, “Because I’m old and have done other things.” His Democratic colleague Chris Murphy noted that Mr. Romney was no longer “hoping to be president someday.”Nor was John McCain, one of the few other Republican senators to meaningfully challenge President Trump. By contrast, Mr. Hawley and Mr. Cruz — desperate to curry favor with Mr. Trump’s base — led the effort to challenge the results of last fall’s election.Not every Republican senator nearing retirement exhibited Mr. Romney or Mr. McCain’s bravery. Lamar Alexander of Tennessee, an octogenarian former presidential candidate himself, voted not only against impeaching Mr. Trump last January, but against even subpoenaing witnesses.Courage cannot be explained by a single variable. Politicians whose communities have suffered disproportionately from government tyranny may show disproportionate bravery in opposing it. Mr. Romney, like the Arizona Republican Jeff Flake — whose opposition to Mr. Trump likely ended his senatorial career — belongs to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, which was once persecuted on American soil. In the fevered days after Sept. 11, the only member of Congress to oppose authorizing the “war on terror” was a Black woman, Barbara Lee.But during that era, too, ambition undermined political courage, and stature fortified it. Virtually every Democratic senator who went on to run for president in 2004 — John Kerry, John Edwards, Hillary Clinton and Joe Lieberman — voted for the Iraq war.By contrast, Mr. Kerry’s Massachusetts colleague, Ted Kennedy, who had been elected to the Senate in 1962, voted against it. The most dogged opposition came from a man who had entered the Senate three years before that, Robert Byrd of West Virginia. Despite hailing from a state George W. Bush had won, and seeing his junior colleague support the war, the 84-year-old Mr. Byrd, a former majority leader, tried to prevent the Senate from voting during the heat of a midterm campaign. His effort failed by a vote of 95 to 1.If Americans want our constitutional system to withstand the next authoritarian attack, we should look for men and women like Senators Romney, Benton and Byrd, who worry more about how they will be judged by history than by their peers. George W. Bush was a terrible president — but might have proved a useful post-presidential senator because he would have been less cowed than his colleagues by Mr. Trump. John Quincy Adams served in Congress for 17 years after leaving the White House. Given how vulnerable America’s governing institutions are, maybe Barack Obama could be convinced to do something similar.Like most people, I’d prefer senators who do what I think is right. But I’d take comfort if more at least did what they think is right. That’s more likely when you’ve reached a phase of life when the prospect of losing an election — or being screamed at in an airport — no longer seems so important. America needs more senators who can say — as Daniel Webster did to his constituents in Massachusetts — “I should indeed like to please you; but I prefer to save you, whatever be your attitude toward me.”Peter Beinart (@PeterBeinart) is professor of journalism and political science at the Newmark Graduate School of Journalism at the City University of New York. He is also editor at large of Jewish Currents and writes The Beinart Notebook, a weekly newsletter.The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: letters@nytimes.com.Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook, Twitter (@NYTopinion) and Instagram.AdvertisementContinue reading the main story More

  • in

    Juicio a Donald Trump: un colofón digno de un mandato presidencial

    #masthead-section-label, #masthead-bar-one { display: none }The Trump ImpeachmentliveLatest UpdatesTrump ImpeachedHow the House VotedRepublican SupportKey QuotesAdvertisementContinue reading the main storySupported byContinue reading the main storyAnálisis de noticiasLa conclusión predestinada de una presidenciaEl segundo proceso de destitución al presidente Trump —en un Capitolio rodeado de tropas— parecía la culminación inevitable de cuatro años que dejan a una nación fracturada, molesta y sin sentido claro de identidad.Integrantes de la Guardia Nacional durante un descanso en el Capitolio cuando resguardaban por turnos la Cámara de Representantes, que se preparaba para votar una moción para someter al presidente Trump a un proceso de destitución.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York Times15 de enero de 2021 a las 05:00 ETRead in EnglishWASHINGTON — Desde los lóbregos días de la Guerra de Secesión y sus repercusiones no se había visto en Estados Unidos un día como el del miércoles.En un Capitolio lleno de soldados fuertemente armados y de detectores de metal recién instalados, tras haber despejado el desastre físico del ataque de la semana pasada, pero con el desastre político y emocional aún a la vista, el presidente de Estados Unidos fue sometido a un proceso de destitución por intentar destruir la democracia estadounidense.De algún modo, parecía el colofón predestinado de una presidencia que en repetidas ocasiones rebasó todos los límites y tensó las relaciones de la clase política. A menos de una semana de que finalice, el periodo del presidente Donald Trump está llegando a su fin con una sacudida de violencia y recriminaciones en un momento en que el país se ha fracturado de manera profunda y ha perdido el sentido de identidad. Los conceptos de verdad y realidad se han pulverizado. La confianza en el sistema se ha erosionado. La ira es el común denominador.Como si no fuera suficiente que Trump es ahora el único presidente que ha sido sometido en dos ocasiones a un proceso de destitución o que los legisladores intentaran retirarlo del cargo a solo una semana del fin de su mandato, Washington se transformó en una miasma de suspicacia y conflicto. Un congresista demócrata acusó a sus colegas republicanos de ayudar a que integrantes de la turba la semana pasada exploraran de antemano el edificio. Algunos congresistas republicanos evadieron los magnetómetros de seguridad utilizados para vigilar que no entren armas al recinto o siguieron avanzando incluso después de activarlos.Todo esto estaba ocurriendo en el contexto de una pandemia que, aunque concita menos atención, ha aumentado de una manera catastrófica en las últimas semanas de la presidencia de Trump.Más de 4400 personas en Estados Unidos fallecieron por el coronavirus el día anterior a las votaciones de la Cámara de Representantes, más personas murieron en un solo día que todas las que fallecierno en Pearl Harbor, el 11 de septiembre de 2001 o durante la batalla de Antietam. Solo después de que varios congresistas se contagiaron durante el ataque al Capitolio y se implementaron nuevas reglas, finalmente usaron cubrebocas de manera constante durante el debate del miércoles.Los historiadores no han podido definir este momento. Lo comparan con otros periodos de enormes desafíos como la Gran Depresión, la Segunda Guerra Mundial, la Guerra de Secesión, la era de McCarthy y Watergate. Rememoran la paliza a Charles Sumner en el pleno del Senado y la maniobra para, por temor a un ataque, introducir furtivamente a Abraham Lincoln a Washington para su toma de posesión.Hacen referencia al espantoso año de 1968 en que el pastor Martin Luther King Jr. y Robert F. Kennedy fueron asesinados mientras que había alborotos en los recintos de las universidades y los centros de las ciudades por la guerra de Vietnam y los derechos civiles. Y piensan en las secuelas de los ataques del 11-S, cuando parecían inevitables más muertes violentas a gran escala. Sin embargo, nada es como estos acontecimientos.“Quisiera poder brindarles una analogía inteligente, pero sinceramente no creo que nada como esto haya sucedido antes”, dijo Geoffrey C. Ward, uno de los historiadores más respetados del país. “Si me hubieran dicho que un presidente de Estados Unidos iba a alentar a una turba delirante a marchar hacia nuestro Capitolio en busca de sangre, yo les habría dicho que estaban equivocados”.De igual manera, Jay Winik, un cronista destacado de la Guerra de Secesión y de otros periodos de conflicto, señaló que no había nada equivalente. “Es un momento insólito, prácticamente sin paralelo en la historia”, comentó. “Es difícil encontrar otro momento en el que la estructura que nos mantiene unidos se viniera abajo de la manera en que lo está haciendo ahora”.Todo esto deja por los suelos la reputación de Estados Unidos dentro de la escena mundial y convierte lo que al presidente Ronald Reagan le gustaba llamar “la ciudad brillante sobre la colina” en un apaleado caso de estudio de los desafíos a los que se puede enfrentar incluso una potencia demócrata madura.“Prácticamente se ha terminado el momento histórico en que éramos un ejemplo”, afirmó Timothy Snyder, historiador especialista en autoritarismo de la Universidad de Yale. “Ahora tenemos que volver a ganarnos nuestra credibilidad, lo cual quizás no sea algo tan malo”.Las escenas del miércoles en el Capitolio nos recordaron a la Zona Verde de Bagdad durante la Guerra de Irak. Por primera vez desde que los confederados amenazaron con cruzar el río Potomac, los soldados tuvieron que acampar por la noche en el Capitolio al aire libre.El debate para decidir el destino de Trump tuvo lugar en la misma sala de la Cámara Baja donde tan solo una semana antes los oficiales de seguridad desenfundaron sus armas y pusieron barricadas en las puertas al tiempo que los legisladores se lanzaban al suelo o escapaban por la puerta trasera para huir de la turba transgresora partidaria de Trump. Todavía flotaba en el aire la indignación por el asalto. También el miedo.No obstante, hasta cierto punto la conmoción ya había pasado y a veces el debate se sentía tan soporífero como de costumbre. La mayoría de los legisladores pronto se retiraron a sus esquinas partidarias.Cuando los demócratas exigieron rendición de cuentas, muchos republicanos se opusieron y los acusaron de precipitarse a una resolución sin audiencias ni pruebas y sin ni siquiera debatir lo suficiente. Los adversarios de Trump hicieron referencia a su discurso provocador durante un mitin justo antes del asalto. Sus defensores citaron las palabras provocadoras de la presidenta de la Cámara Baja, Nancy Pelosi; de la representante Maxine Waters, e incluso de Robert De Niro y de Madonna para argumentar que había un doble rasero.Daba igual que se comparan peras con manzanas. Importaba más la perspectiva. Trump buscó anular una elección democrática que perdió denunciando falsamente un fraude generalizado, presionando a otros republicanos e incluso a su vicepresidente a apoyarlo y envió a una multitud de seguidores revoltosos al Capitolio a “luchar como el demonio”. Sus aliados, no obstante, dijeron que Trump hacía tiempo era blanco de lo que consideraban ataques e investigaciones injustas y partidistas.“Donald Trump es el hombre más peligroso en ocupar el Despacho Oval”, declaró el congresista Joaquin Castro, demócrata por Texas.“La izquierda en Estados Unidos hasta ahora ha incitado más violencia política que la derecha”, declaró Matt Gaetz, congresista republicano por Florida.En la era de Trump, los puntos de vista radicalmente distintos encapsularon a Estados Unidos. En algún momento, el representante por Maryland Steny Hoyer, líder de la mayoría demócrata, se mostró irritado por la descripción de los hechos del partido contrario. “Ustedes no viven en el mismo país que yo”, exclamó. Y, al menos en eso, todos pudieron estar de acuerdo.Después de alentar a una multitud de sus partidarios a marchar hacia el Capitolio la semana pasada, Trump no ha mostrado arrepentimiento por su papel al incitar los disturbios.Credit…Oliver Contreras para The New York TimesTrump no se defendió y optó por dejar de lado los acontecimientos históricos. Después de las votaciones, publicó un mensaje en video de cinco minutos en el que censuró de manera más amplia la violencia de la semana pasada y repudió a quienes la perpetraron. “Cuando hacen algo así, no están apoyando nuestro movimiento, lo están atacando”, afirmó.Sin embargo, no manifestó pesar ni mostró darse cuenta de que hubiera tenido alguna responsabilidad por nada de esto cuando favoreció la política de la división no solo la semana pasada, sino durante cuatro años. Y aunque no mencionó de manera explícita el proceso de destitución, se quejó de “el ataque sin precedentes a la libertad de expresión” al referirse, al parecer, a la suspensión indefinida de su cuenta de Twitter y a las acciones contra sus aliados que trataron de ayudarle a impedir la certificación de los resultados de las elecciones.A diferencia del primer proceso de destitución de Trump, motivado por presionar a Ucrania para que le ayudara a desprestigiar a los demócratas, esta vez lo abandonaron algunas personas de su partido. Al final, diez republicanos de la Cámara de Representantes se unieron a todos los demócratas para aprobar el único artículo de juicio político, liderados por la representante por Wyoming, Liz Cheney, la tercera republicana en jerarquía. El hecho de que la familia Cheney, quienes solían considerarse provocadores ideológicos, aparecieran en este momento como defensores del republicanismo tradicional fue una prueba de cuánto ha cambiado el partido bajo el mandato de Trump..css-1xzcza9{list-style-type:disc;padding-inline-start:1em;}.css-c7gg1r{font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-weight:700;font-size:0.875rem;line-height:0.875rem;margin-bottom:15px;color:#121212 !important;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-c7gg1r{font-size:0.9375rem;line-height:0.9375rem;}}.css-1sjr751{-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;}.css-1sjr751 a:hover{border-bottom:1px solid #dcdcdc;}.css-rqynmc{font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-size:0.9375rem;line-height:1.25rem;color:#333;margin-bottom:0.78125rem;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-rqynmc{font-size:1.0625rem;line-height:1.5rem;margin-bottom:0.9375rem;}}.css-rqynmc strong{font-weight:600;}.css-rqynmc em{font-style:italic;}.css-yoay6m{margin:0 auto 5px;font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-weight:700;font-size:1.125rem;line-height:1.3125rem;color:#121212;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-yoay6m{font-size:1.25rem;line-height:1.4375rem;}}.css-1dg6kl4{margin-top:5px;margin-bottom:15px;}.css-16ed7iq{width:100%;display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;-webkit-align-items:center;-webkit-box-align:center;-ms-flex-align:center;align-items:center;-webkit-box-pack:center;-webkit-justify-content:center;-ms-flex-pack:center;justify-content:center;padding:10px 0;background-color:white;}.css-pmm6ed{display:-webkit-box;display:-webkit-flex;display:-ms-flexbox;display:flex;-webkit-align-items:center;-webkit-box-align:center;-ms-flex-align:center;align-items:center;}.css-pmm6ed > :not(:first-child){margin-left:5px;}.css-5gimkt{font-family:nyt-franklin,helvetica,arial,sans-serif;font-size:0.8125rem;font-weight:700;-webkit-letter-spacing:0.03em;-moz-letter-spacing:0.03em;-ms-letter-spacing:0.03em;letter-spacing:0.03em;text-transform:uppercase;color:#333;}.css-5gimkt:after{content:’Collapse’;}.css-rdoyk0{-webkit-transition:all 0.5s ease;transition:all 0.5s ease;-webkit-transform:rotate(180deg);-ms-transform:rotate(180deg);transform:rotate(180deg);}.css-eb027h{max-height:5000px;-webkit-transition:max-height 0.5s ease;transition:max-height 0.5s ease;}.css-6mllg9{-webkit-transition:all 0.5s ease;transition:all 0.5s ease;position:relative;opacity:0;}.css-6mllg9:before{content:”;background-image:linear-gradient(180deg,transparent,#ffffff);background-image:-webkit-linear-gradient(270deg,rgba(255,255,255,0),#ffffff);height:80px;width:100%;position:absolute;bottom:0px;pointer-events:none;}#masthead-bar-one{display:none;}#masthead-bar-one{display:none;}.css-1cs27wo{background-color:white;border:1px solid #e2e2e2;width:calc(100% – 40px);max-width:600px;margin:1.5rem auto 1.9rem;padding:15px;}@media (min-width:740px){.css-1cs27wo{padding:20px;}}.css-1cs27wo:focus{outline:1px solid #e2e2e2;}.css-1cs27wo[data-truncated] .css-rdoyk0{-webkit-transform:rotate(0deg);-ms-transform:rotate(0deg);transform:rotate(0deg);}.css-1cs27wo[data-truncated] .css-eb027h{max-height:300px;overflow:hidden;-webkit-transition:none;transition:none;}.css-1cs27wo[data-truncated] .css-5gimkt:after{content:’See more’;}.css-1cs27wo[data-truncated] .css-6mllg9{opacity:1;}.css-k9atqk{margin:0 auto;overflow:hidden;}.css-k9atqk strong{font-weight:700;}.css-k9atqk em{font-style:italic;}.css-k9atqk a{color:#326891;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;border-bottom:1px solid #ccd9e3;}.css-k9atqk a:visited{color:#333;-webkit-text-decoration:none;text-decoration:none;border-bottom:1px solid #ddd;}.css-k9atqk a:hover{border-bottom:none;}The Trump Impeachment ›From Riot to ImpeachmentThe riot inside the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, followed a rally at which President Trump made an inflammatory speech to his supporters, questioning the results of the election. Here’s a look at what happened and at the ongoing fallout:As this video shows, poor planning and a restive crowd encouraged by Mr. Trump set the stage for the riot.A two hour period was crucial to turning the rally into the riot.Several Trump administration officials, including cabinet members Betsy DeVos and Elaine Chao, announced that they were stepping down as a result of the riot.Federal prosecutors have charged more than 70 people, including some who appeared in viral photos and videos of the riot. Officials expect to eventually charge hundreds of others.The House voted to impeach the president on charges of “inciting an insurrection” that led to the rampage by his supporters.Los diez republicanos disidentes no fueron tantos en comparación con los 197 miembros del partido que votaron contra el proceso de destitución. Por otro lado, fueron diez más de los que votaron para destituir a Trump en diciembre de 2019. También fueron el mayor número de miembros del propio partido del presidente en apoyar un proceso de destitución en la historia de Estados Unidos.Otros republicanos intentaron ser más sutiles al aceptar que Trump tenía responsabilidad por haber incitado a la muchedumbre y al mismo tiempo sostuvieron que eso no representaba un delito que amerita iniciar un proceso de destitución, o que resultaba insensato, innecesario y divisorio justo días antes de que Joe Biden, el presidente electo, tomara posesión del cargo.“Eso no significa que el presidente esté libre de culpa”, señaló el representante por California, Kevin McCarthy, líder de la minoría republicana y uno de los aliados más fieles de Trump, cuando se pronunció contra el juicio político. “El presidente tiene responsabilidad por el ataque del miércoles al Congreso por parte de los alborotadores. Debió haber reprendido de inmediato a la turba cuando vio lo que estaba sucediendo”.No obstante, era asombrosa la fidelidad que tantos republicanos de la Cámara Baja mostraron por un presidente que perdió su reelección y que ha hecho tanto daño a su propio partido. “Si la abrumadora mayoría de los representantes electos de uno de los dos partidos estadounidenses no puede rechazar la influencia de un demagogo ni siquiera después de que abiertamente conspiró para anular unas elecciones y al hacerlo amenazara sus vidas mismas, pues entonces tenemos un largo camino por delante”, señaló Frank Bowman, especialista en procesos de destitución de la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Misuri.Brenda Wineapple, autora de The Impeachers, un libro sobre el juicio al presidente Andrew Johnson en 1868, dijo que identificó en el debate del miércoles algunos de los argumentos que se hicieron en aquel entonces en contra de la convicción: que sería un mal precedente, que solo dividiría aún más al país.También encontró otro eco, un deseo de superar al polarizante Johnson en favor de su esperado sucesor, Ulysses S. Grant, quien, como Biden, era visto como una figura conciliadora. “Me da esperanza”, dijo. “Debemos tener esperanza”.Pero la extensión de la reconciliación que necesita Estados Unidos es un proyecto que podría resultar abrumador para cualquier presidente sin un consenso bipartidista más amplio. Es posible que a Trump se le someta al proceso de destitución pero casi con certeza terminará la última semana de su mandato y no tiene planes de marcharse discretamente con vergüenza o en la ignominia como otros presidentes que perdieron la reelección han hecho, lo que lo convertiría en una fuerza residual de la vida nacional, incluso desmejorada.Lo que es más, las personas que ven su derrota como un llamado a las armas siguen siendo una fuerza. Los funcionarios de seguridad refuerzan las tropas en Washington para la toma de mando de Biden de la próxima semana, preocupados de que se repita la invasión al Capitolio. Luego de que Trump le dijo falsamente a sus seguidores una y otra vez que la elección había sido robada, las encuestas sugieren que millones de estadounidenses le creen.“La víspera de la elección de 1940, Franklin Delano Roosevelt dijo que la democracia es más que una palabra: ‘Es una cosa viva —una cosa humana—de cerebros y músculos y alma y corazón’”, dijo Susan Dunn, historiadora de Williams College y biógrafa del presidente Franklin D. Roosevelt.Ahora, dijo, tras los eventos de los últimos días y años, “sabemos que las democracias son frágiles y que los cerebros y el alma de nuestra democracia corren un grave riesgo”.Peter Baker es el corresponsal principal de la Casa Blanca y ha cubierto las gestiones de los últimos cuatro presidentes para el Times y The Washington Post. También es autor de seis libros, el más reciente de ellos se titula The Man Who Ran Washington: The Life and Times of James A. Baker III. @peterbakernyt • FacebookAdvertisementContinue reading the main story More

  • in

    ‘Stop the Steal’ Didn’t Start With Trump

    AdvertisementContinue reading the main storyOpinionSupported byContinue reading the main story‘Stop the Steal’ Didn’t Start With TrumpMainstream Republicans and conservative commentators have been pushing the idea that Democrats can only win through fraud for decades.Opinion ColumnistJan. 15, 2021, 5:00 a.m. ETJan. 6, 2021.Credit…John Minchillo/Associated PressTo explain the attack on the Capitol, you can’t just turn your focus to Donald Trump and his enablers. You must also look at the individuals and institutions that fanned fears of “voter fraud” to the point of hysteria among conservative voters, long before Trump. Put another way, the difference between a riot seeking to overturn an election and an effort to suppress opposing votes is one of legality, not intent. And it doesn’t take many steps to get from one to the other.Conservative belief in pervasive Democratic Party voter fraud goes back decades — and rests on racist and nativist tropes that date back to Reconstruction in the South and Tammany Hall in the North — but the modern obsession with fraud dates back to the 2000 election. That year, Republicans blamed Democratic fraud for narrow defeats in New Mexico, which George W. Bush lost by just a few hundred votes, and Missouri, where the incumbent senator, John Ashcroft, lost his re-election battle to a dead man.Ashcroft’s opponent, Mel Carnahan, was killed three weeks earlier in a plane crash, but his name was still on the ballot, with his wife running in his stead. Shocked Republicans blamed Ashcroft’s defeat on fraud. At Ashcroft’s election-night party, the state’s senior Republican senator, Kit Bond, said, “Democrats in the city of St. Louis are trying to steal this election.”In 2001, as the newly minted attorney general under President George W. Bush, Ashcroft announced a crackdown on voter fraud. “America has failed too often to uphold the right of every citizen’s vote, once cast, to be counted fairly and equally,” he said at a news conference that March:Votes have been bought, voters intimidated and ballot boxes stuffed. The polling process has been disrupted or not completed. Voters have been duped into signing absentee ballots believing they were applications for public relief. And the residents of cemeteries have infamously shown up at the polls on Election Day.The Republican National Committee supported this push, claiming to have evidence that thousands of voters had cast more than one ballot in the same election.Over the ensuing years, under pressure from the White House ahead of the presidential election in 2004, the Justice Department ramped up its crusade against voter fraud. Of particular interest was ACORN, a now-defunct advocacy organization that was working — as the presidential election got underway — to register hundreds of thousands of low-income voters. Swing-state Republicans accused the group of “manufacturing voters,” and federal prosecutors looked, unsuccessfully, for evidence of wrongdoing. Later, Karl Rove would press President Bush’s second attorney general, Alberto Gonzales, to fire a number of U.S. attorneys for failure to investigate voter fraud allegations, leading to a scandal that eventually led to Gonzales’s resignation in 2007.ACORN and voter fraud would remain a bête noire for Republicans for the rest of the decade. Conservative advocacy groups and media organizations produced a steady stream of anti-ACORN material and, as the 2008 election campaign heated up, did everything they could to tie Democratic candidates, and Barack Obama in particular, to a group they portrayed as radical and dangerous. ACORN, Rush Limbaugh said in one characteristic segment, has “been training young Black kids to hate, hate, hate this country.”During his second debate with Obama, a few weeks before the election, the Republican nominee, John McCain, charged that ACORN “is now on the verge of maybe perpetrating one of the greatest frauds in voter history in this country, maybe destroying the fabric of democracy.” And his campaign materials similarly accused Obama, Joe Biden and the Democratic Party of orchestrating a vast conspiracy of fraud. “We’ve always known the Obama-Biden Democrats will do anything to win this November, but we didn’t know how far their allies would go,” read one mailer. “The Obama-supported, far-left group, ACORN, has been accused of voter-registration fraud in a number of battleground states.”McCain and the Republican Party devoted much of the last weeks of the election to a voter fraud scare campaign with ACORN as the villain. And while, in the wake of the election, these allegations of illegal voting never panned out, the conservative fixation with voter fraud would continue into the Obama years and beyond.Not that this was a shock. As an accusation, “voter fraud” has been used historically to disparage the participation of Black voters and immigrants — to cast their votes as illegitimate. And Obama came to office on the strength of historic turnout among Black Americans and other nonwhite groups. To the conservative grass roots, Obama’s very presence in the White House was, on its face, evidence that fraud had overtaken American elections.In 2011, Republicans in Alabama, Kansas, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Wisconsin capitalized on their legislative gains to pass new voter restrictions under the guise of election protection. Other states slashed early voting and made it more difficult to run registration drives. One 2013 study found that in states with “unencumbered Republican majorities” and large Black populations, lawmakers were especially likely to pass new voter identification laws and other restrictions on the franchise.The 2012 election saw more of the same accusations of voter fraud. Donald Trump, who had flirted with running for president that year, called the election a “total sham and a travesty” and claimed that Obama had “lost the popular vote by a lot.” According to one survey taken after the election, 49 percent of Republican voters said they thought ACORN had stolen the election for the president.ACORN, however, no longer existed. It closed its doors in 2010 after Congress stripped it of federal funding in the aftermath of a scandal stoked by right-wing provocateurs, whose accusations have since been discredited.The absence of any evidence for voter fraud was not, for Republicans, evidence of its absence. Freed by the Supreme Court’s ruling in Shelby County v. Holder, which ended federal “preclearance” of election laws in much of the South, Republican lawmakers passed still more voter restrictions, each justified as necessary measures in the war against fraud.Prominent Republican voices continued to spread the myth. “I’ve always thought in this state, close elections, presidential elections, it means you probably have to win with at least 53 percent of the vote to account for fraud,” Scott Walker, then the governor of Wisconsin, said in a 2014 interview with The Weekly Standard. “One or two points, potentially.”Rank-and-file Republicans had already been marinating in 16 years of concentrated propaganda about the prevalence of voter fraud by the time Donald Trump claimed, in 2016, that Hillary Clinton had won the popular vote with millions of illegal ballots. If Republican voters today are quick to believe baroque conspiracy theories about fabricated and stolen votes, then it has quite a lot to do with the words and actions of a generation of mainstream Republican politicians who refused to accept that a Democratic majority was a legitimate majority.The narrative of fraud and election theft that spurred the mob that stormed the Capitol would be unintelligible without the work of the Republican Party, which inculcated this idée fixe in its voters. “Stop the Steal” wasn’t a Trump innovation as much as it was a new spin on an old product line that, even after the violence on Jan. 6, Republicans are still selling.Credit…Erin Schaff/The New York TimesThe Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips. And here’s our email: letters@nytimes.com.Follow The New York Times Opinion section on Facebook, Twitter (@NYTopinion) and Instagram.AdvertisementContinue reading the main story More